Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Create Account now to join.

Welcome to the Motorcycle Forum.

Register ButtonIf this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 71
  1. #31
    Seat Tester
    My Bike(s)
    1997 BMW R1100RT
    Location
    Wilson, NY
    Posts
    69
    Thanks. The Goldwings are too much bike. I saw the Harley in the Buffalo ads awhile ago. It is on my watch list. Price is right. I won't have funds until late Feb early March. I will end up with a HD at some point. HD is a big part of American history and some family history as well. My grandfather toured the country on a knucklehead. He and is brother used to build and race motorcycles. I wish he, and the bike were still around.

  2. MotorcycleForums.net is the original Motorcycle Forum! Registered Users do not see these ads. Please Register - It's Free!

  3. #32
    Y2K
    Y2K is online now
    Can Ride And Chew Gum
    My Bike(s)
    Electraglide Classic
    Location
    Mt.St.Helens
    Posts
    2,183
    Quote Originally Posted by lighthiker90 View Post
    Thanks. The Goldwings are too much bike. I saw the Harley in the Buffalo ads awhile ago. It is on my watch list. Price is right. I won't have funds until late Feb early March. I will end up with a HD at some point. HD is a big part of American history and some family history as well. My grandfather toured the country on a knucklehead. He and is brother used to build and race motorcycles. I wish he, and the bike were still around.
    I hear that,again I'd start smaller and work up.
    Family history I understand as well,my Dad bought a 1929 JDH Harley new when he was just 18 years old and he had memories of his Dad (I never met) riding some of the real early bikes in the WWI era and just after.

  4. #33
    Seat Tester
    My Bike(s)
    FXDWG
    Location
    Twin (frozen) Lakes, WI
    Posts
    80
    Harleys are twice the fun and twice the bike.
    Turn on, tune in and ride off.

  5. #34
    Fifth gear streak
    My Bike(s)
    Suzuki M50 2010
    Location
    Sydney Australia
    Posts
    1,329

    Is a touring bike really all that wrong for starting out?

    For twice the price

  6. #35
    Seat Tester
    My Bike(s)
    1997 BMW R1100RT
    Location
    Wilson, NY
    Posts
    69
    Agreed on both the fun and price accounts! I know several indivduals who do accounting work/auditing and tax prep. Harley Dealers are not short on cash. I still want one. They hold their value well.

  7. #36
    Y2K
    Y2K is online now
    Can Ride And Chew Gum
    My Bike(s)
    Electraglide Classic
    Location
    Mt.St.Helens
    Posts
    2,183
    Quote Originally Posted by lighthiker90 View Post
    Agreed on both the fun and price accounts! I know several indivduals who do accounting work/auditing and tax prep. Harley Dealers are not short on cash. I still want one. They hold their value well.
    Couple other points,they never go out of style or look dated,older is even cooler on style points.
    They are infinately rebuildable so one bike can last a lifetime if you want,if Gramps Knuck was available you could still get any part you want,even a brand new crate motor for a bike as old as 1936.
    If my Dads '29 was still around I could even get parts to rebuld it,pretty amazing really.
    Transmissions can be rebuilt without taking the motor apart,but they are generally pretty tough anyway,mine is original as is the clutch and even the clutch cable at 172,000 miles and all works fine.
    If you travel their dealer network is the best there is so if you need service there's always a dealer not far away.
    Old WWII vets will come up and tell ya about the Harley they had back in the day,I love it when that happens!

  8. #37
    Seat Tester
    My Bike(s)
    2009 Victory Vision
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by lighthiker90 View Post
    My wife has graciously indulged my midlife crisis and agreed to my dream of having a bike and heading out west to the Grand Canyon. I have signed up for the MSF rider course. I realize in an ideal world one should start with a smaller bike and then trade up. I will have about 2 months of riding pracitice before I head out west. I am really better off with something small to start on and then discover a larger bike on one of my first trips out? I would think I would be better off dealing with the nuances of a larger bike to begin with so I am completely comfortable with it before heading out. Any thoughts or opinions?
    I started out with a 900 and within 4 months I was ready for a 1731. Don't waste time with the little bikes, go big now.

  9. #38
    M-J Lifetime Achievement Award
    My Bike(s)
    '10 Kaw Vulcan 900 Custom
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    8,264
    Quote Originally Posted by kodonnell1 View Post
    Don't waste time with the little bikes, go big now.
    Everybody is entitled to his own opinion......but that one conflicts with the conventional wisdom.

    Unless the new rider is a really BIG person, you learn quicker and better on a smaller bike that is more maurverable and more forgiving of sudden throttle changes.

    And, for the original poster, two months experience is ***NOT*** enough before taking off on a major road trip, regardless of what kind/size bike you have.

    As for "needing" a big bike for road trips, you really don't. I did a 1200 mile trip on a 250 and had a blast. You can't get in a hurry though.
    Don't believe everything that you think.

  10. #39
    Seat Tester
    My Bike(s)
    1997 BMW R1100RT
    Location
    Wilson, NY
    Posts
    69
    I agree with not "needing" a larger bike for road trips. It is whatever fits. I disagree with the experience necessary for a major trip. In my opinion there is no difference between gaining experience fast vs gaining experience slow. It still needs to be gained. If I gain that experience in small short trips close to home or one long trip far away from home it is still an experience gained. The proximity to home is the only difference.

  11. #40
    Y2K
    Y2K is online now
    Can Ride And Chew Gum
    My Bike(s)
    Electraglide Classic
    Location
    Mt.St.Helens
    Posts
    2,183
    Quote Originally Posted by lighthiker90 View Post
    The proximity to home is the only difference.
    Well not exactly,close to home you can ride roads you are already familiar with for one.
    You can avoid places with heavy traffic in unfamiliar surroundings,not a good place to be for a newbie.
    If you do fail and crash you are close to home,rather be local if I break a leg lol.
    There are a whole other set of circumstances that can arise on a trip far from home which experience can overcome a lot easier than having none.

  12. #41
    In Training
    My Bike(s)
    2006 Suzuki M50
    Location
    New Orleans, LA
    Posts
    120
    lighthiker90:

    Boy... arent you the guy who asked the question in the first place? And now you have an "opinion" about what works and what doesnt, even though you have nothing to base that opinion on?You're funny. I wish you luck, and Im being very sincere.
    Last edited by BlackM50; 02-04-2013 at 12:26 PM.
    2006 Suzuki M50
    2007 Victory Hammer

  13. #42
    M-J Lifetime Achievement Award
    My Bike(s)
    '10 Kaw Vulcan 900 Custom
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    8,264
    Quote Originally Posted by lighthiker90 View Post
    In my opinion there is no difference between gaining experience fast vs gaining experience slow.
    In addition to what has already been mentioned, your brain needs some time to digest and "store" what it has learned.
    Thus, in most cases, learning is better done by repeating the practice/training in small doses over a longer period of time.
    Trying to cram too much into a small amount of time sometimes results in information "overflow".

    Unless you are a REALLY calm and laid back person, the stress level gets higher the farther from "home" (familiar turf) you get.

    You can believe whatever you please but the expert opinion disagrees with you on this point.
    Don't believe everything that you think.

  14. #43
    M-J Lifetime Achievement Award
    My Bike(s)
    '10 Kaw Vulcan 900 Custom
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    8,264
    Quote Originally Posted by BlackM50 View Post
    Boy... arent you the guy who asked the question in the first place?
    It would help if you would include a small quote from the person you are addressing, especially with a remark like that, 40 messages into a thread.
    Don't believe everything that you think.

  15. #44
    In Training
    My Bike(s)
    2006 Suzuki M50
    Location
    New Orleans, LA
    Posts
    120
    My comment was directed at the op. Its clear the effort people put in to explain things in the 3 pgs of this thread didnt really register with him. And theres a lot of very good and useful info in this thread. No worries, theres no better teacher than first hand experience.
    Last edited by BlackM50; 02-04-2013 at 12:40 PM.
    2006 Suzuki M50
    2007 Victory Hammer

  16. #45
    Seat Tester
    My Bike(s)
    1997 BMW R1100RT
    Location
    Wilson, NY
    Posts
    69
    Quote Originally Posted by BlackM50 View Post
    lighthiker90:

    Boy... arent you the guy who asked the question in the first place? And now you have an "opinion" about what works and what doesnt, even though you have nothing to base that opinion on?You're funny. I wish you luck, and Im being very sincere.
    Yup that was me. Thanks for your input. I appreciate it. I spent 11 years on the road in countries all over the world and I am about as laid back as them come. Being on the road and away from home became a way of life and it doesn't induce stress.

    I never claimed to be correct, just stating my point of view as others have. For me personally an oh crap moment at home vs an oh crap moment far away holds no difference. I have had oh crap moments in countries where I didn't speak the language. I got by just fine. I have seen others completely loose it.
    Last edited by lighthiker90; 02-04-2013 at 01:10 PM.


 

Ads

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Similar Threads

  1. Wrong bike
    By wookie in forum The Paddock
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 04-25-2008, 08:42 AM
  2. Sport bike touring?
    By spirit in forum The Long Road - Adventure Touring
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-04-2008, 11:42 AM
  3. What's wrong with my bike?
    By bookzguy in forum Katana Planet Emergency Shelter
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-14-2006, 03:26 AM
  4. Wrong bike?
    By grissom29 in forum Sportbikes & Sport-tourers
    Replies: 42
    Last Post: 10-13-2004, 02:15 PM
  5. WTF is wrong with my bike!!!
    By gsrider in forum Mechanics Corner
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-24-2004, 10:16 AM