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  1. #1
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    Polaris Acquires Indian Motorcycle


    Polaris Industries Inc. (NYSE: PII) today announced the acquisition of Indian Motorcycle. The business was acquired from Indian Motorcycle Limited (“IML”), a company advised by Stellican Limited and Novator Partners LLP, U.K. Private Equity firms. Terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

    “We are excited to be part of the revitalization of a quintessentially American brand,” said Scott Wine, CEO of Polaris Industries Inc. “Indian built America’s first motorcycle. With our technology and vision, we are confident we will deliver the classic Indian motorcycle, enhanced by the quality and performance for which Polaris and Victory are known.”

    With this acquisition, Polaris adds one of motorcycling’s legendary brands to its strong stable of Victory cruiser and touring bikes. Indian will operate as an autonomous business unit, building upon the potent combination of Polaris’ engineering acumen and innovative technology with Indian’s premium brand, iconic design and rich American heritage.

    “We are delighted to have reached an agreement with Polaris. Polaris will utilize its well-known strengths in engineering, manufacturing, and distribution to complete the mission we undertook upon re-launching the brand in 2006: harness the enormous potential of the Indian brand,” said Stephen Julius, chairman of Indian and managing director of Stellican. “Polaris is the most
    logical owner of Indian Motorcycle. Indian’s heritage brand will allow Polaris to aggressively compete across an expanded spectrum of the motorcycle market.”

    Novator Partners LLP is a London based alternative investment firm founded and led by the investor Mr. Thor Bjorgolfsson. An avid motorcycle enthusiast, Mr. Bjorgolfsson said “After a troubled past, our goal was to bring the legendary Indian bikes back on the roads. The initial phase of that project is done and now our great partners at Polaris will carry on the work to realize the full potential of this classic American brand."

    Conference Call and Webcast Presentation
    Tomorrow, April 20th at 9:00AM (CT), Polaris Industries Inc. will host a conference call and webcast to discuss the acquisition, as well as the first quarter 2011 financial results. The call will be hosted by Scott Wine, CEO, Bennett Morgan, President and COO and Mike Malone, Vice President-Finance and CFO.

    A slide presentation and link to the audio webcast will be posted on the Investor Relations page of the Polaris web site at www.polarisindustries.com/irhome approximately 30 minutes before the conference call begins.

    To listen to the conference call by phone, dial 800-374-6475 in the U.S. and Canada, or 973-200-3967 internationally. The Conference ID is #36643140. A replay of the conference call will be available approximately two hours after the call for a one-week period by accessing the same link on our website, or by dialing 800-642-1687 in the U.S. and Canada, or 706-645-9291 internationally.
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  3. #2
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    that is just going to ruin the quality, I am sure of it.

  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by limitedbyfourkawiby2 View Post
    that is just going to ruin the quality, I am sure of it.
    Quite the contrary,Polaris has deep pockets and can do the R&D needed and the Victory brand is a Polaris brand so they already have MC R&D going on.
    The last reincarnation of the Indian brand was a dismal failure with basically a warmed over Harley clone drivetrain and some stupid looking valve covers to try and hide that fact.
    The new Indian motor that Ploaris has developed is clean sheet and they paid close attention to the styling of the original Indian Chief,I think they're doing a great job on it so far.

    http://www.cycleworld.com/2013/03/09...v-twin-engine/



    The original Indian.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...v=qa-uCh2KN_s#!
    Last edited by Y2K; 04-01-2013 at 09:40 AM.

  5. #4
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    think of how rare an Indian motorcycle is now, then think how rare they will be in ten years once Polaris starts producing them.

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by limitedbyfourkawiby2 View Post
    think of how rare an Indian motorcycle is now, then think how rare they will be in ten years once Polaris starts producing them.
    Rare? original Indians 1901-1954 or the revival bikes that were overpriced and unreliable?
    I doubt the new ones will be huge sellers,likely priced well over a Victory and probably sold at the same dealers,probably more than a comparable Harley cruiser as well.
    Niche bikes for those with money that want something different,safe bet they'll never be produced in the quantities of Harley Davidson.
    Last edited by Y2K; 04-01-2013 at 03:29 PM.

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    Indian HAVE to be extremely high priced. They are basically a start up: Polaris sold their factory and moved production to a small corner of the already rather small Victory plant, killed off all existing models, and they are NOT selling the new ones through Victory dealerships. So basically they have two options:

    1- Build 200-500 bikes the first year, build them out of top-shelf parts, price them at the high end of factory motorcycles so they are attractive as a status symbol, and continue to assemble them in a small corner of the Victory plant with a few well-trained guys. Turn a modest profit by having a larger per-unit profit and selling all 500 bikes. This is the business model followed by a dozen small boutique brands that still produce high-priced bikes on a small scale did when they started up, and also what Victory did when they started up.

    2- Invest a hundreds of millions to build and set up a big factory to produce bikes in high volumn- maybe 20,000 bikes the first year; build them out of mass produced parts from new vendors not used to supplying parts on that scale, spend hundreds of million on marketing and developing a dealership network; try to recruit and train a thousand employees in a very short time; invest hundreds of million in logistics and warranty support to deal with not only sales and shipment but also the huge percentage of recall and warranty work that will come from that inexperienced workforce and the rapid start up; price the bikes at a level equal or lower than Harley and offer low-interest financing to try and actually sell those 20,000 bikes in the first year; avoid crippling losses only if they manage to sell all 20,000 bikes (and even then it will take a decade to recover your start up investment), which will be impossible if quality is no better than the other bikes in its class from established brands, and as a side effect put Victory out of business because your new product line is stealing all of their sales. Or more likely, overproduce, have a trouble-plagued product that does not sell, lay off the workers so the overall quality of the workforce never improves, so bankrupt after one or two years. This is the business model followed by Excelsior-Henderson, and the first two distributors of the Korean bikes now sold as Hyosung.

    Now, which one does it look like Polaris is following with their new brand? Obviously the one that, well, works when starting a motorcycle company. LOL! The problem with the last incarnation of Indian was that thier bikes were not expensive enough. Had they cost twice as much, and that money been spent to make them high quality, they probablyu would have sold well. The one thing about rich people is that they always have money to spend, even in a crappy economy, so while the lower priced bikes like Suzuki were seeing such drastic drops in sales that they actually stopped producing and skipped a model year, and car companies like Hundai and Suzuki were taking a bath sales wise, there was still a waiting list for a Rolls Royce or a Ferrari.
    Last edited by DrBob; 04-01-2013 at 05:09 PM.
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    I must admit the polaris engine sounds amazing. It is like fiat co-owning Maserati with Ferrari in 1997 and fiat owning maserati since 1993. If that isn't too much to understand, fiat does not make high end sports cars like Ferrari does but it seems like Maserati is somewhere in the middle as far as quality and performance is concerned.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by limitedbyfourkawiby2 View Post
    I must admit the polaris engine sounds amazing. It is like fiat co-owning Maserati with Ferrari in 1997 and fiat owning maserati since 1993. If that isn't too much to understand, fiat does not make high end sports cars like Ferrari does but it seems like Maserati is somewhere in the middle as far as quality and performance is concerned.
    The auto world is so intertwined it makes little difference who owns who anymore.
    BMW owns Rolls Royce,unbelievable,this stuff changes all the time.

    Last edited by Y2K; 04-02-2013 at 08:00 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Y2K View Post
    BMW owns Rolls Royce,unbelievable
    It is even stranger than that, because technically BMW does not own Rolls Royce, they only own the rights to the Rolls Royce brand name, and the cars they produce and sell under the Rolls Royce brand name have no connection to the historical Rolls Royce company. The traditional Rolls Royce car company is owned by VW, but can not sell cars under the Rolls Royce name anymore.

    Rolls Royce (the car company) and Rolls Royce (the aircraft engine/ defense company) used to be the same company, called Rolls Royce Limited. The company fell on hard times and was taken over by the British Government. In 1973 the British Government split it into Rolls Royce Motors and Rolls Royce PLC, two completely separate and independent companies. The rights to the 'Rolls Royce" name were retained by the earospace company, which leased it for a nominal fee to Rolls Royce Motors. Vickers bought Rolls Royce Motors in 1980, and in 1998 decided it was time to sell the company. BMW tried to buy it, as they had been providing engines for Rolls Royce Motors for many years, and they felt purchasing Rolls Royce would add the crown jewel to their company: Rolls Royce would be the ultimate in quality & luxury, BWM the ultimate in performace, and Mini the ultimate in fun. But BMW was outbid by VW, which was so busy scrambling to buy the car company that they failed to acquire the brand name from Rolls Royce pcl, assuming they would simply continue to license it as Rolls Royce Motors had always done.
    But BMW went to Rolls Royce pcl and offered 40 million pounds to license the brand name, which the earospace company immediately agreed to, as they were partners in other ventures. So VW had paid 430 million pounds for a car company that could no longer use its own brand name, and which was completely dependant upon a bitter rival for drivelines- an agreement BMW could cancel on short notice anytime they wanted.
    But BMW was not exactly sitting pretty either. They owned the brand name but not the actual car company; they could drive that company out of business anytime they wanted to, but that would destroy the value of the brand name, which sort of defeated the whole purpose.
    So BMW and VW worked out a deal: after 4 years of the status quo, the two companies would part ways. VW would get Rolls Royce Motors, the factory, and the workforce, but could no longer use the Rolls Royce name. They changed the name from "Rolls Royce Motors" to "Bentley Motors Limited" and continue to produce cars at the old Rolls Royce factory in England under the Bentley brand name. New Bentley models would no longer use BMW engines, and some lower-end Bentley models come off the same German production line as the Audi A8 and the VW Pheaton.
    BMW would sell cars under the "Rolls Royce" brand, but had to start their own company, design new models, build thier own factory (in a different part of England), and call their new company "Rolls Royce Motor Cars."
    So Rolls Royce is now Bentley, and the BMW owned Rolls Royce is a completely different company. This has got to be the oddest change of ownership in automotive history.
    Last edited by DrBob; 04-02-2013 at 03:14 PM.
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  11. #10
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    I think audi has something where each of the circles represents a different car company made in Germany-Volkswagen BMW-Mercedes and something else. not sure on the facts of that one but I remember reading something in high school about it.

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    Close, but no. The four circles do not represent other present day German car companies, which are Audi's competitors. They represent the four companies that merged together to form modern-day Audi: Audiwerke GmbH, which first used the brand name "Audi" on their cars in 1910; A. Horch & Cie Motorworks, which made "Horch" brand cars and merged with Audiwerke GmbH in the 1930s; Winklhofer & Jaenicke, which made the "Wanderer" brand cars and was bought by Audi in 1945; and NSU Motorenwerke, which made 'NSU" brand cars and merged into Audi in 1969.

    All the cars made by the three companies before their merger with Audi were considered to be exceptional quality cars, and are highly collectable today. Horch made top-shelf luxury cars and did not survive the inter-war depression in Germany. Wanderer made luxury cars but was taken over to make military vehicles by the Nazis, resulting in their factory being bombed flat during the war. NSU sold their car line to Fiat in the 1920s and made motorcycles only, but started making cars again in the late 1950s. They were good cars, but in the early 1960s NSU went "all in" on their revolutionary Wankel (rotary) engine. The developed a whole line of cars around it, plus licensed it to Mazda and 10 other companies all around the world, all of whom anticipated that rotary engines would dominate the market in the future. But the rotary engine was a troublesome sales flop that nearly bankrupted NSU, so they sold out to VW, which merged them into Audi. NSU motorcycles were killed off immediately, but the cars limped on until the mid-1970s. They continued to collect licensing fees from Mazda until last year, when the rotary RX7 was finally killed off.
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  13. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrBob View Post
    Close, but no. The four circles do not represent other present day German car companies, which are Audi's competitors. They represent the four companies that merged together to form modern-day Audi: Audiwerke GmbH, which first used the brand name "Audi" on their cars in 1910; A. Horch & Cie Motorworks, which made "Horch" brand cars and merged with Audiwerke GmbH in the 1930s; Winklhofer & Jaenicke, which made the "Wanderer" brand cars and was bought by Audi in 1945; and NSU Motorenwerke, which made 'NSU" brand cars and merged into Audi in 1969.

    All the cars made by the three companies before their merger with Audi were considered to be exceptional quality cars, and are highly collectable today. Horch made top-shelf luxury cars and did not survive the inter-war depression in Germany. Wanderer made luxury cars but was taken over to make military vehicles by the Nazis, resulting in their factory being bombed flat during the war. NSU sold their car line to Fiat in the 1920s and made motorcycles only, but started making cars again in the late 1950s. They were good cars, but in the early 1960s NSU went "all in" on their revolutionary Wankel (rotary) engine. The developed a whole line of cars around it, plus licensed it to Mazda and 10 other companies all around the world, all of whom anticipated that rotary engines would dominate the market in the future. But the rotary engine was a troublesome sales flop that nearly bankrupted NSU, so they sold out to VW, which merged them into Audi. NSU motorcycles were killed off immediately, but the cars limped on until the mid-1970s. They continued to collect licensing fees from Mazda until last year, when the rotary RX7 was finally killed off.
    I should copy and paste that to my email address and save as draft but that would make it too easy. the suzuki re-5 is interesting but a little overdone.
    On a different note maybe there sill be a worlds fastest Indian remake.

  14. #13
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    I like polaris, and I like indian but to put them together is like two girls humping. just seems like a waste to put two liked things together like that.


 

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