Newb owner 2008 M50
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  1. #1
    Newbie
    My Bike(s)
    2008 Boulevard M50
    Location
    Toronto ON, Canada
    Posts
    1

    Newb owner 2008 M50

    Newbie owner here of a 2008 M50 with 6250km on it. can anyone suggest tome items to check regarding what maintenance should have been done over it's life to date? This one is in really mint shape and looks like the tires were replaced within the last 2 years. Also what have owners of the 2005-2009 model years done for modifications, have windscreen and saddlebags from previous owner. Any tips would be appreciated.
    I will head off to start using the search feature as I have some time to kill, but what have people done for mobile accessories and USB power. I currently have a MOCO Genie trickle charger but couldn't find one of their adapters with a USB output to charge a reserve battery pack.

    TIA

    Stephen
    Last edited by Smik66; 07-10-2019 at 05:03 PM. Reason: update

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  3. #2
    Newbie
    Posts
    1
    Welcome to the club! Hope you have many years of enjoyment ahead with your new (to you) M50.

    There are many mods to make, some little and some big. Personally I've done the following little mods:
    - Mustang seat (so much more comfortable)
    - LED headlight and signal lights.
    - Wing pedals
    - Upgraded grips

  4. #3
    Super Moderator

    My Bike(s)
    Can-AM Spyder
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    12,128
    Quote Originally Posted by Smik66 View Post
    I currently have a MOCO Genie trickle charger but couldn't find one of their adapters with a USB output to charge a reserve battery pack.
    I hope it is a smart charger and not really a "trickle charger". There is a big difference.

    Then......what kind of battery pack are you trying to charge ??
    USB is 4.5 volts. Your battery charger is 12 Volts. You can't go from one to the other with a simple "adapter".
    Don't believe everything that you think.

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  6. #4
    In Training
    My Bike(s)
    2001 Kawasaki ZG1200 Voyager XII, 1971 Honda CB100
    Location
    Clovis NM USA
    Posts
    101
    Quote Originally Posted by Smik66 View Post
    Also what have owners of the 2005-2009 model years done for modifications, have windscreen and saddlebags from previous owner. Any tips would be appreciated.
    I will head off to start using the search feature as I have some time to kill, but what have people done for mobile accessories and USB power.
    Welcome to the forum, Stephen. Probably easiest is a handle bar mounted cigarette lighter styled socket. Then get a cigarette lighter to USB converter module that plugs in if the socket doesn't come with a USB socket with converter. When wiring, make sure the fuse is easily accessible without having to unbolt a lot of stuff. I rewired a previous owner's accessories on my 2001 Kawasaki ZG1200 Voyager XII because he had in-line fuses hidden under the fairing, a major chore to get to.

    A 15" Meyers mini-windshield does wonders. I put one on my previous ride, a 1987 Suzuki LS650 Savage that I rode for 10 years. It kept the wind off my chest making riding more enjoyable. Regarding saddle bags, there are many options. You can either mount the web between bags overtop the pillion seat, or putting it under the pillion seat. You may want to check into saddle bag guards. These keep the saddle bags from rubbing the tires in motion, probably the best money spent. You can get a less expensive saddle bag set for starters, then later upgrade when you are more familiar with what's out there and sell or give away the older set.

    Crash bars will help protect your ride during falls when parked or moving at very low speeds. I've seen folk swear that they never drop their bike, but I know that is definitely not true. Ride your Suzuki daily if possible even for short trips. You'll become more comfortable with it and get to know its handling characteristics. You'll benefit more by doing this than riders who only do weekend warrior stuff.

    The stock seat can be improved upon with an aftermarket one. If you get butt burn after an hour or two, one of the better aftermarket ones will make a huge difference. The one on my Savage was a 1 hour seat, very painful riding thereafter. I upgraded to a padded gel one for the later Boulevard (still LS650), which made it much more comfortable. However, you'll get to know your bike more as you ride. Some make do fine with the OEM seat, others don't.

    Regarding maintenance, you'll want to get a manual for your ride. I got an owners manual for my Savage some time back from E-Bay, and a Clymers or Haynes manual too. The aftermarket manual had gross wiring diagram errors. The Suzuki OEM manual was correct and thus I relied upon it. These will let you know what should be maintained at what miles. When I first got the bike in 2003 with 6k miles, the valves were set at zero clearance (good way to burn valves) and the cylinder head studs apparently were never tightened (600 or 1000 mile service apparently was never performed).

    Also, always check your oil level at least at every other fill, which should be done with the bike upright and not leaning on the kick stand. Bikes will use a little oil, more when weather is hot - engines run hotter than on cars. Some have ruined their engines by not topping off oil level, requiring expensive repair or considered totaled because parts and repair labor costs exceed the bike's value.

    Congrats, and enjoy your ride.

    Sincerely, George

    "And we know love by this, that He laid His life down for us, and we ought to lay down our lives for the brethren." 1st John 3:16

  7. #5
    Newbie
    My Bike(s)
    2009 M50
    Posts
    23
    Hey, welcome to M50 world! I have an '09 and I love it.

    Maintenance-wise, they're pretty low maintenance- one reason I chose it. The shaft drive never needs adjustment, just change out the 90W once in a while. Some people do it every time they change the motor oil, but I don't think that's necessary and neither does the manual. I don't think in general there's anything that needs more attention on an M50 than on any other bike. Mine has been very trouble-free for the 2 years I've had it. Do get a manual and follow the recommended maintenance intervals. Then just check the oil and tire pressures every week or so.

    I second the recommendation to check the valve clearances, it's hell getting to a couple of them but I managed. If you're not pretty mechanically skilled, just let a good mechanic do it. A couple of mine were too tight, which will burn up a valve.

    Check the date codes on the tires. Tires get old, and on a bike that doesn't get out much they'll get old before they get worn. You can look up how to find and read the codes. Over 5 years old they should be replaced.

    I got an outlet that mounts on the handlebar, that has a cigarette lighter outlet and 2 usb ports. I can't find a link from when I bought it, but you can probably find one on Amazon or Ebay. One other essential item is a telescoping inspection mirror to check the oil. The bike has to be upright to read that sight glass correctly, and unless you have a helper it's near impossible to check. This mirror https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1 has a tiny LED light, and I can use it to check the oil and the coolant.

    I have the crash bars and highway pegs and I like them. My seat is a Saddlemen Explorer. It makes me sit up closer to the tank than the stock seat, but I got used to that and it's a really comfortable seat.

    I personally like a lot of lighting. More to be seen than to see with. I have LEDs front, back and sides wired to the turn signals, and a front-and-back Skene lite system. Not cheap, but I don't want someone to not see me. And some LED auxiliary driving lights.

    One more thing, the previous owner put some nice fat grips on and I think they're nice. I think they're these: https://www.jpcycles.com/product/160...-throttle-boss. I love the throttle paddle, you can loosen your grip and avoid getting your right hand as tired.

    Have fun and let us know how it goes.


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