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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering if anyone can give me some advice. I was riding on the highway at about 85 mph and my Katana started spraying oil all over me. Didn't lose power or anything, but I stopped immediately and turned the bike off. It proceeded to leak the rest of the oil. Got it back to my place to inspect it to see where the oil leak was coming from. Filled it up with oil and no leak. Turned it on and oil seemed to be gushing out of the slots where the spark plugs are. I ended up taking off the valve cover and cleaning everything up in there and replacing all of the gaskets, as well as replacing the spark plugs. Put it all back together and it runs like crap. Full choke and it'll barely run. Any ideas or suggestions?
 

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Turned it on and oil seemed to be gushing out of the slots where the spark plugs are.
I suggest that a professional diagnosis would be in order. Truck it there; don't ride it.

Could be lots of things and about half probably wouldn't be worth fixing......like a cracked head.

We can talk later about riding a "dual purpose" bike down the freeway at 85.
 

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There is no longer an oil leak, so I don't believe that its a cracked head. It just runs really rough now. Hate throwing away money at the shop but I guess thats what I have to do...

And I agree, Katanas are sport bikes, not dual purpose.
 

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What did the sparkplugs look like? oil soaked?
Did you find the source of the oil that leaked out, it had to come from somewhere right?
I'm thinking you may have blown a head gasket, you should pull the plugs again and check for compression.
You may find it's running rough because you have no or very low compression in a couple of cylinders.
 

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Yea the plugs were oil soaked. The oil seemed to be coming from the holes in which the plugs sit. And the only component that could possibly contain oil in that area is the valve cover right? The bike still runs and the exhaust is normal color, so I don't think I'm burning any oil. Its just extremely rough.
 

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Yea the plugs were oil soaked. The oil seemed to be coming from the holes in which the plugs sit. And the only component that could possibly contain oil in that area is the valve cover right? The bike still runs and the exhaust is normal color, so I don't think I'm burning any oil. Its just extremely rough.
Well if the plugs were covered with oil you have problems and no the valve cover area is not where your oil is coming from,oil could be coming into the cylinder from a blown head gasket or broken rings or a piston or two with holes in the top.
Oil in the cylinders is bad news, valve cover gaskets and new plugs isn't going to do much for you unfortunately.
If you are lucky it's just a blown head gasket, more likely a blown motor.
As said a compression test is in order.
 

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Well if the plugs were covered with oil
He hasn't really said if the oil was on the INSIDE of the plugs or just the outside; BIG difference.

And sorry about the "dual-purpose" comment. I must have been thinking of something else........although going 85 if the prevailing traffic is 70 could be bad for rider AND bike.
 

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Yea the plugs were oil soaked. The oil seemed to be coming from the holes in which the plugs sit. And the only component that could possibly contain oil in that area is the valve cover right?
He hasn't really said if the oil was on the INSIDE of the plugs or just the outside; BIG difference.
Looks to me like it's coming from the inside by his last post above.
The OP needs to clarify that point,plugs oil soaked on the part that goes in the cylinder or just the exterior where the wires snap on?

If this is where you have oil you've got problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Sorry. To clarify, the oil did not look like it was on the inside. The plugs had signs of usual wear, but certainly weren't oil soaked from the inside. The oil seemed to be gushing into the slot where the plugs reside from somewhere else. When I turned the bike on to inspect the leak the exhaust was clear with no white smoke. I was under the impression that if there was oil in the cylinders, the exhaust would be white. Also, after replacing the the valve cover gaskets, there is no longer an oil leak, but the bike runs extremely rough. Have to fully choke it to get it to start (which isn't normal), and runs very rough after started.
 

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White smoke is coolant, blue/gray is oil, black is too much gas.
Maybe the valve covers leaked enough oil to foul up the plug wires, pretty hard to diagnose something like this over the net.
A 15 year old bike could probably use some new plug wires anyway if they are original.
 

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White smoke is coolant, blue/gray is oil, black is too much gas.
Maybe the valve covers leaked enough oil to foul up the plug wires, pretty hard to diagnose something like this over the net.
A 15 year old bike could probably use some new plug wires anyway if they are original.
+1

(Except that white can be condensation at start up or a little oil.....as the oil smoke doesn't get noticeably blue until it is REAL heavy. A sniff test usually will tell the difference.)

Also, I wonder if the oil could have saturated something else too.......like an ignition module.
 

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Ahh okay, got the colors mixed up. Either way, I didn't notice anything out of the ordinary about the color of the exhaust or the smell. I'll see if I can get a video of me starting it to see what you guys think.

I also noticed that my oil was a murky brown color, even right after I changed it and ran the bike for about 1 min. Looking through that little oil window on the crank. Before it seemed like it was always amber colored, never cloudy.
 

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I also noticed that my oil was a murky brown color, even right after I changed it and ran the bike for about 1 min. Looking through that little oil window on the crank. Before it seemed like it was always amber colored, never cloudy.
Makes me think head gasket again.
 

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Ahh okay, got the colors mixed up. Either way, I didn't notice anything out of the ordinary about the color of the exhaust or the smell. I'll see if I can get a video of me starting it to see what you guys think.

I also noticed that my oil was a murky brown color, even right after I changed it and ran the bike for about 1 min. Looking through that little oil window on the crank. Before it seemed like it was always amber colored, never cloudy.
It's an oil cooled engine, so the only thing to mix with the oil and cause it to turn milky would be gas.

Katana CV carbs are really susceptible to leaking fuel past them at the float needles. They have no overflow when that happens, so fuel will drain into the cylinder and down into the crank case. Over filling the crank case with the now fuel oil mix will cause multiple issues.

1. bike runs hot as the new mix isn't very cooling as oil alone.

2. bike runs rich as the engine is designed to spray the oil in multiple places including on the bottom of the pistons. This allows the fuel when the engine is hot to seep into the cylinder combustion area when running and way richen things up.

3. The mix will push out the crank case vent on the very top and flood over the engine if the vent line isn't securely attatched to the airbox... if it is securely attached, it would flood the air box... and that can cause the whole thing to be recycled into the engine again.

If the oil smells of fuel at all... then you need to pull the carbs, clean them, verify on the bench they are no longer leaking, then change the oil at least once and run the engine for a few miles, then change it again. You don't need to change the filter as fuel in the filter alone wont damage it, but you do want to flush all the fuel out as best possible. The minute remaining amount will evaporate out from normal use after the one drain, run, drain - flush.

Extreme situations could cause physical damage from hydro lock, but it's also extremely rare.

Krey
 
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