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Yes you are correct with the listen to what they tell you. The Harley lady that was in ours failed because of that reason. She acted like she knew everything and bombed everything... her son passed though. I still think if you learn the basics of shifting and moving it will still help you be more confident while in the class though. This one lady was freaking out about friction zone the whole class... the other lady who wound up leaving couldn't get the bike to move. It would of just flowed a lot easier if people at least had basic operating experience imo. Some catch on faster than others. But with knowing basics you're less likely to be worried about it along with everything else. The only experience I had was when I got my s50 about 25-30 days prior to the course. The instructors told me to stop showing off while doing the weave/ swerving practice because they could only do it using friction zone, and I did it using nothing but the throttle. Having a smaller bike personally though helped me with that and with dodging all the potholes in our lovely state haha.


This hasn't been the case in my experience. Roughly half the people in my class were complete newbies and most of them passed the class. Most of the people who failed the class had riding experience.
I think better advice would be: Listen to and follow your course instructor's advice and you will do fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #62
So I need a co signer to move forward with the bike because my credit history is so young. Hopefully I can get somebody in my family to help me out, otherwise I may just have to save up a while for a smaller bike to pay in cash with.
 

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Hopefully I can get somebody in my family to help me out, otherwise I may just have to save up a while for a smaller bike to pay in cash with.
Listen....here's a bit of advice from someone who's been around for many moons.......and from financial experts too......even Judge Judy:

NEVER involve anyone else in your credit commitments, especially family.
And don't get so desperate that you go someplace like Amscot for a suckers loan either.

Save up and get something that you really can afford.
In the end, you will be happy that you did.
 

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PATIENCE!!! Remember that you are going to have to get rid of whatever you might buy that you don't really want, and that isn't always easy and could cost you money if you can't sell it for what you have in it.

I'm sorry, I didn't go back and read every post, but I have read enough to know the basics of your problem, so if this has already been answered I'm sorry: what is your budget?

Also, if you are just getting started, there is no problem with getting someone to help you out for a first loan to help you build credit. If you had BAD credit then someone would be crazy to co-sign with you, but as a young person trying to establish credit, with a person you know and trust and who trusts you, dont' hesitate to get a co-signer. Just make sure everything is established as to what is expected of you.

Don't go out and buy just anything JUST to get a bike, regardless... you'll be unhappy.
 

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Just a quick question guys, would a little gs250t be to small to buy as a cheap little learner for me? 6" 1' ish and 250lbs?
It's done......but not very often.
You need to give it at least a "sit test" to see how the seat, pegs and bars fit your particular frame.

You might want to correspond with this user: bikerlbf406
He has some experience with a similar situation.
 

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Also, if you are just getting started, there is no problem with getting someone to help you out for a first loan to help you build credit. If you had BAD credit then someone would be crazy to co-sign with you, but as a young person trying to establish credit, with a person you know and trust and who trusts you, dont' hesitate to get a co-signer. Just make sure everything is established as to what is expected of you.
I agree. When I was 16, my dad co signed a loan for me. I paid it off 5 months early. Now 36 years later, I've never needed a co signer again and have gotten credit on things when most people would have been turned down. I received my home loan in '89 while only making $6 an hour. The banker actually told me that I didn't make enough money per hour to qualify for the loan, but my credit history tells them that somehow, I will make the payments.
 

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I agree. When I was 16, my dad co signed a loan for me. I paid it off 5 months early. Now 36 years later, I've never needed a co signer again and have gotten credit on things when most people would have been turned down. I received my home loan in '89 while only making $6 an hour. The banker actually told me that I didn't make enough money per hour to qualify for the loan, but my credit history tells them that somehow, I will make the payments.
Similar story for me. My first loan was for a car when I was 16 also. My parents co signed for me and I've never had to do it again.

It isn't a bad thing to have some help when you first start out. Just remember that it's a helping hand, not a hand out. Don't take advantage and do right by the people that are helping you begin your adult life.

You've got a lot of great tips from some smart people on here, use that knowledge. They've been there, done that.

Whatever you decide to do let us all know. And post some pics when you get your first ride! Best of luck to you.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #71
After a lot of thought. I'm going to just keep saving money up to buy a pretty cheap, smaller and older bike.

The mechanic that I go to for my car (2 brothers that own their own shop) have a friend that's a motorcycle mechanic. (The guys are pretty great, reasonable labor prices and have sold me numerous parts for my car at whatever price they would be paying for. Or atleast cheaper than I can find anywhere else. All with same day pick up, so I can do the job myself. So I trust their judgement).

This mechanic just sort of ends up with a lot of random bikes. When I was first looking at the brand new S40 a couple weeks ago he had an old Yamaha cruiser that had sold an hour before I stopped by that would've been great. So I think I'm just gonna hold out for a while. Continue checking craigslist and him to see if anything comes along.

I do believe however that about a year after I buy this smaller bike I'll be in a better financial position (hopefully) and definitely have a an actual credit history to take a loan out on something bigger.

Ill definitely keep keep you guys updated on what comes along though.

Yesterday I looked at a 1981 Honda CX500. It was a POS though. No coolant cap, just a rag shoved in there. Bike dirty as all hell. One of the pipes was rattling, and after driving it around the block oil started seeping out of what looked like the front part of the engine with some smoke coming from the front ride side. So I passed.

I also found a 1981 Suzuki GS250. I didn't go to see it in person because the owner wanted $1400 for it and would only go as low as $1100. But the pictures showed it as being super clean. The only mod done being the odometer being replaced. It did only have 5700 miles though. (Odometer on the bike showed 16,000 but they still had the broken one showing about 5400)
 

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The only problem with older bikes in those years is parts availability. Most companies won't make parts past 10 years after the model year. It doesn't mean that a part isn't available somewhere, but no guarantees.
 

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I also found a 1981 Suzuki GS250. I didn't go to see it in person because the owner wanted $1400 for it and would only go as low as $1100. But the pictures showed it as being super clean. The only mod done being the odometer being replaced. It did only have 5700 miles though. (Odometer on the bike showed 16,000 but they still had the broken one showing about 5400)
IF they are being honest about the actual miles, it's a 34 year old bike that's been sitting around a lot, so you'd have to plan to spend about another grand to fix whatever problems they're not telling you about. And it's got some, or it would have sold already.
 

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Discussion Starter #75
So I did find a 2007 Vulcan 500 for $1500. It states in the ad it's in excellent condition, but what worries me is that it's price is so low.

Do do you guys have any thoughts on it?
 

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So I did find a 2007 Vulcan 500 for $1500. It states in the ad it's in excellent condition, but what worries me is that it's price is so low.

Do do you guys have any thoughts on it?
It is priced to sell.
Small cruisers like that aren't really popular most places; thus a lower price.

If it has low miles, it probably has the original tires which need to be changed. That alone can run around $400.

If it really IS in good condition and has any extras at all......like windshield or bags, I think it is a good buy.

But......ASK, if it's been wrecked, if it's had any major problems and if they have the owner's manual and spare key(s).
 

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Discussion Starter #77
I didn't even look at the mileage when I asked about it. It's got just under 76000. Which would indicate why it's so cheap I'm guessing. I'm gonna ask to make sure that he didn't accidentally add another number on there
 

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So many variables involved...depends on the bike, depends on the owner, depends on the way it was ridden. That vulcan 500 should go 100k-200k miles if it was taken care of and probably more. The issue is that you can't really know how they took care of it unless you know the owner personally. Sportbikes generally have shorter lifespans because they are usually ridden hard, that's why people buy them right? Goldwings and other big bikes generally last longer because the kind of people who buy them tend to maintain them, plus their bigger engines don't have to work as hard as a v-twin 500.
 
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