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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Getting back into riding after 30 years. Took the MSF course and passed really well two weeks ago, (on a 500cc Harley). Waiting for my 2008 C50T to arrive on Tuesday.

Anything in particular I should know about this particular bike (handling, turning, braking, throttle, etc.), before I take it out for the first ride?Thanks for any tips or advice!
 

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Welcome back. I would advise to go slow and cautious as you learn the bike. I don't know that particular bike but in general take it easy as you get familiar with the brakes, handling, balance etc. and enjoy.
 

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Find some place with little traffic present where you can practice sweeping curves at speed.

In addition to, and maybe more important than, the MSF low speed training, you need to get a feel for the quickness of the steering inputs.

You do know about countersteering and leaning into a turn......right ??
 

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Hello and Welcome.
I just started riding again this season, after not riding for 40 years......
What helped me the most....2 things...like Easy said--sweeping curves on lonely quiet roads and
a book--Proficient Motorcycling by David Hough.

Enjoy and Ride Safe.
 

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Never let your guard down,the moment you get comfortable with what you're doing is when things can get out of control in a hurry.
Just my 2cts.........40+ years in the saddle/over 500,000 miles.
 

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Getting back into riding after 30 years. Took the MSF course and passed really well two weeks ago, (on a 500cc Harley). Waiting for my 2008 C50T to arrive on Tuesday.

Anything in particular I should know about this particular bike (handling, turning, braking, throttle, etc.), before I take it out for the first ride?Thanks for any tips or advice!
Welcome to the forum from Oregon. I would highly recommend investing in the Ride Like a Pro videos...or at a bare minimum watch the Youtube videos for some coaching. They are very helpful.

The C50 is a very easy bike to ride...and light weight too! Check the air pressure on the tires and if I were you, I'd add a couple extra psi more than the factory recommends at least. The bike is geared really low...too low for my liking actually. But there are mods you can do down the road if it's a problem for you. It's a very easy bike to get moving though and the friction zone very responsive. You will like riding it.

Also, the OEM seat bites...at least it does for most of us after a little while in the saddle. If you find your tail bone starting to hurt you'll want to consider a different seat or modify the one you have. I bought a Mustang seat and in hind sight would have been very happy with the Suzuki gel seat which is quite a bit less expensive. Risers are commonly needed too. You can add up to 4" without pulling the cables in front of the triple tree. There are lots of things you'll need to figure out and fine tune to what's comfortable for you...but it'll take time.

As mentioned, do some neighborhood riding (lower speeds) and assume you are invisible (always!).

Best of luck and congrats' on the purchase.

Larry
 

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Beware of the texters and phone chatters, they didn't exist the last time you rode.
I usually try to scare them. Creep up alongside their driver side door, then redline the throttle. After that I give them the "hang up the phone" sign. One of life's little pleasures... It's fun ;)
 

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If you can, try to go to where you took the class and do the riders course exercises on the new bike.
Where took mine is a parking lot that is open all the time. I go there to refresh one in a while.
 

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If you can, try to go to where you took the class and do the riders course exercises on the new bike.
Where took mine is a parking lot that is open all the time. I go there to refresh one in a while.
Same here. The lot my course was on is about 10 min away from my house. All the dots and lines needed are painted really well year round. Good practice spot.

Have met a couple other riders there that do the same thing too.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Thank you all for taking the time to reply!

The bike arrived Tuesday. But didn't want to take it out until the highway bars were put on. That was yesterday.

Took it out around the block a few times. Great ride...except...kept getting it into neutral when I didn't want to. After some sharp words between my boyfriend and myself, (he was following in a car), we figured out I wasn't keeping my foot forward enough. So without realizing it, I was using the heel shifter. I'm really going to have to concentrate on foot position. He thinks we should swap out the heel / toe shifter to just a toe version.

Also had some problems with right turns from a stop. Was taking them wide. But my left turns, even the tight ones were surprisingly good. Now have the fear of riding the new bike for the first time behind me. I was really (!) worried how it was going to go.

More practice today. Unfortunately there isn't any ideal place to do that around me. The closest parking lot is far enough away that I would need an experienced rider to get the bike there for me. I don't have one of those available. The riding course is over an hour away so that's not an option either.

Which means getting seat time on the street. Not a lot of traffic but enough. Roads are also not in the best condition. I have to pull out of / into a gravel driveway that opens onto a gravel alley with potholes. I may be learning the "hard" way but at least it is getting me ready for the world of riding. :)
 

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Thank you all for taking the time to reply!

The bike arrived Tuesday. But didn't want to take it out until the highway bars were put on. That was yesterday.

Took it out around the block a few times. Great ride...except...kept getting it into neutral when I didn't want to. After some sharp words between my boyfriend and myself, (he was following in a car), we figured out I wasn't keeping my foot forward enough. So without realizing it, I was using the heel shifter. I'm really going to have to concentrate on foot position. He thinks we should swap out the heel / toe shifter to just a toe version.

Also had some problems with right turns from a stop. Was taking them wide. But my left turns, even the tight ones were surprisingly good. Now have the fear of riding the new bike for the first time behind me. I was really (!) worried how it was going to go.

More practice today. Unfortunately there isn't any ideal place to do that around me. The closest parking lot is far enough away that I would need an experienced rider to get the bike there for me. I don't have one of those available. The riding course is over an hour away so that's not an option either.

Which means getting seat time on the street. Not a lot of traffic but enough. Roads are also not in the best condition. I have to pull out of / into a gravel driveway that opens onto a gravel alley with potholes. I may be learning the "hard" way but at least it is getting me ready for the world of riding. :)
You seem to have a good head on your shoulders. That's the most important thing to have when you start riding. Being mindful of the dangers alone will keep you out of most of the bad situations.

You'll do fine. Best of luck to you. And post some pics of the new ride!

EDIT: get rid of that heal toe shifter. Your husband is right, easy fix.
 
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