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Discussion Starter #1
Good day all,

I'm new to the forum so forgive me if this has been covered elsewhere. I don't see it, but I may have missed it.

I newly acquired a 2007 VL1500 (C90). After running it a while I found that a small quantity of oil would spray out of somewhere on the left side of the engine onto the keyswitch area and the left fuel tank cover. Some oil would also appear to have run down onto the left side of the engine housings. It was not really possible to determine where the oil was coming from because it was evenly distributed over the area, but it must have been above the gearbox housing to get that high. The oil in the engine at the time was some mineral multi-grade but I have no way of knowing what exactly. No oil leaks out the bottom of the engine.

I did an oil change to Castrol Edge 10W-60 and the oils spray stopped entirely. Much to my joy.:)

Anybody find this before?

Many thanks.
 

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I did an oil change to Castrol Edge 10W-60 and the oils spray stopped entirely. Much to my joy.:)
I hope that 60 is a typo.
10W40 is recommended unless you are in a VERY hot climate; then 10W50.

I'm not familiar with that model but they all have a Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV) system that has a hose to route crankcase fumes back to the air intake.
Over time, the bottom of the air filter housing can accumulate a little oil under normal conditions. If the crankcase was over-filled a LOT of oil can find it's way into
the air filter housing.....and the filter. Check that. There might be a drain hose near the bottom of the air intake housing with a stopper on the end too.
 

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Many thanks for your advice. I'll certainly follow it up immediately. On the oil's viscosity range: Castrol Edge is a fully synthetic oil recommended for racing and other high-stress environments. The upper figure of 60 doesn't mean the oil is any heavier than say a 10W40 it just means that it will maintain target viscosity to a higher temperature. In other words when 10W40 gets above it's temperature limit it falls out of the viscosity envelope, while 10W60 maintains it a while longer. In fact the reason I elected to use it is that the area where I live (Cape Town,South Africa) is beset with road upgrades where lane closures mean long waiting periods, up to 15 minutes. At times like this of course you shut the engine off to prevent over-heating, but there are still instances of slowly crawling along while there is little wind over the cooling vanes and you cringe when you think how the engine is suffering down there.

Without instrumentation it is difficult to determine cylinder head and oil temperatures accurately so I thought I'd play it safe and use the most expensive oil I could find. Oil still being cheaper than engines.

Thanks again for your excellent and prompt response - I see that you are a major source of wisdom on this forum, I've read many of your other comments and advices.

Best regards

Fyko
 

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I know how the oil designations work. A 10W60 will be a little bit thicker than a real 10 weight or a 10W40 even.
If it worked perfectly the way you described it, there would be no reason to even MAKE the lower viscosity versions and every vehicle in the world would recommend 10W60.
They don't. There is a good reason for that.

The point IS.....if you have a water cooled engine, there is no reason for the high viscosity oil, IF you use a little common sense.
 
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