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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have to rewire my chopped up Kawasaki.

Does anyone have any good resources for me to read? I want to keep it as simple as possible, but also as simple as possible to fix down the road.

Other than asking for sources to read up on, my main question at this point is:
[HR][/HR]I've seen some diagrams where people have just ran one single 30 amp fuse for the whole bike. Are there any drawbacks to running just one fuse?

I'm under the impression that fuses are supposed to bust before your wires do, making electrical troubleshooting easier. But I have no clue how one 30 amp fuse fits into that equation.
 

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The main drawback to a single 30-amp fuse is that it defeats the purpose of having fuses. The idea is that a fuse should allow enough power for the items on the line, but should blow as soon as there is too much power drawn (indicating that something has gone wrong). If you have everything on one fuse, you run the risk of burning out many of the electrical components (or, if you're really unlucky, having the whole bike go up in flames). Further, 30a at 12v = 360 watts - easily enough power to kill you. Do you really want to risk a potentially fatal shock when you're replacing a lightbulb?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I appreciate the response, even though my gut is telling me that your math or the problem solving behind it may be a bit wrong (I don't think the fuse I select will increase the amperage of my battery... at least that much.)

but following my initial quote....

Does anyone have any good resources for me to read?
I'm just looking to get some research done.
 

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The main drawback to a single 30-amp fuse is that it defeats the purpose of having fuses. The idea is that a fuse should allow enough power for the items on the line, but should blow as soon as there is too much power drawn (indicating that something has gone wrong). If you have everything on one fuse, you run the risk of burning out many of the electrical components (or, if you're really unlucky, having the whole bike go up in flames). Further, 30a at 12v = 360 watts - easily enough power to kill you. Do you really want to risk a potentially fatal shock when you're replacing a lightbulb?
Sorry mate it doesn't work that way, you can't get a fatal shock with 12 volts, unless you have a heart conditions, you need plenty of volts.

That main problem using one fuse is that if you have a short you will lose everything and 30 amps is way too much for a simple bike, system, you will cook some of your wiring long before it blows. I would go for a simple 2 fuse circuit like system like Simple Motorcycle Wiring Diagram for Choppers and Cafe Racers ? Evan Fell Motorcycle Works

Or google "Simple motorcycle wiring" and find something really simple to cover the stuff you have.

Use fuses sized for the circuit they are there to protect, by adding everything up. It is no big deal if you undersize any of them as fuses are cheap and easy to change.
 
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