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The SV1000 manual says 36psi but the tires say 42psi cold. I checked mine and they were really low, like around 30psi, so I put them at 36 and what a difference, handles like a totally different bike. I'm wondering whether I should go all the way up to 42.
 

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No. Always use the tire pressures listed in the manual and on the sticker ( usually on swing arm ). The number listed on the tire is MAX pressure.
 

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No. Always use the tire pressures listed in the manual and on the sticker ( usually on swing arm ). The number listed on the tire is MAX pressure.
:plus1: And your application does not require the MAX pressure.
 

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The tire manufacturer should list the correct pressures on their website. Most tires will be 33-36 psi though.
For specific vehicles? Never heard of that info from a tire company.
 

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I only believe The tire pressure levels on the swing arm for the stock tire, period. After the stock tire is gone and I have put different brand on, I usually run slightly under max pressure. The numbers on the bike can mislead you if you run a different tiire/rim combo. There is no way I would believe the pressure ratings on the side of my truck if I put different tires on than what was stock.

just my 2 cents.
 

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I only believe The tire pressure levels on the swing arm for the stock tire, period.
You can believe that all you want but it won't make it true. :roll:
A motorcycle is not a truck.

Those pressures are still good as long as you stay with the same size and general construction as the OEM. The specific brand makes no difference.

All bets are off if you make drastic changes to size or style, however.

You might be amazed at how much better your bike rides if you put the tires back to the proper pressure! :mrgreen:
 

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As long as you stay close to the recomended rating you will be fine. I prefer an extra 2psi in my rear tire but run the front at the recomended pressure...
 

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The numbers on the bike can mislead you if you run a different tiire/rim combo.
That's certainly true, but how many of us have different rims? The pressure on the bike is set to match the suspension, expected load, and tire. I'd stick with it unless you have a good reason not to, not just a rumor or gut feeling.
 

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Hehe, I have a GSXR front wheel, about to get an F3 rear wheel....

Neither of them are "for" the SV. :p

FWIW, I think in rain if you have higher tire pressure there is less chance of hydro planing, and slightly lower pressure means less warmup time in cold weather.
 

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Use manufacturers spec

You can go to the website of most major manufactures of tires and you'll find specs for your particular bike. Tires are built differently by different companies so Ass-Suming you should use the OEM spec is ignorant. For instance when I changed to Avon Storms on my Suzuki the OE spec was 32 front and 36 rear, Avon says to run 36 front and 42 rear. A huge difference and as a note the bike handles much better with the Avon spec pressure.
 

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For instance when I changed to Avon Storms on my Suzuki the OE spec was 32 front and 36 rear, Avon says to run 36 front and 42 rear. A huge difference and as a note the bike handles much better with the Avon spec pressure.
OK, fair enough but I wouldn't call a change of 4 lbs front and 6 lbs rear a HUGE difference. :roll:

What do the tires say on the side about MAX. pressure?
The OP seemed to think that figure was a recommended operating pressure.
 

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That is a huge difference. Both car and bike racers adjust to fractions of a psi! I know from experience what a change that much pressure makes.

Or did you just need an excuse to roll your eyes again?
 

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Boy, here's another topic that can be as controversial as oil and gas threads. The OP simply said his pressure was low, went to the recommended pressure with good results, then asked if the pressure printed on the tire would be even better.

The tire pressures given in a manual or by a manufacturer are a good base line. After that, a ton of variables can come into play if you want to go that far. As an example, Rowdy and I own basically the same bike. However, He runs Pirelli and I run Dunlops, I have a good hundred pounds on him and until recently, we had different riding styles and bike setup. His, long distance touring, mine, back road carving. I doubt we use the same tire pressures.

With the tires I run, I'm usually within 2-3 lbs of the spec pressure. The B12 calls for 36 psi front and rear.

Hot weather, straight line commute, 2 up or gear - 38-39 psi
Cold weather, aggressive twisties, solo for fun - 33-34 psi
Track - 28-30 psi

After base line, It's completely a personal thing. However a 2-3 psi change makes a huge difference on a bike.

Please, no one bring nitrogen filled tires into this. :p
 

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Or did you just need an excuse to roll your eyes again?
Yes. :roll: :mrgreen:

No, seriously.......came back to add this later:
One of my pet peeves is people who can't be objective and let their narrow personal experiences taint their view of "reality".
So, here I AM, doing the very same thing. Not good.

With my very conservative riding habits, a few pounds one way or another won't make much difference. I can see, however, that a pound or 2 could make a big difference with different riding conditions.

I'm pretty sure that fractions of a pound aren't going to be significant unless you are pushing the envelope.......either of raw speed or traction or both.
 

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Good post, Palanon. Your numbers match mine almost exactly for all three scenarios.
 

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:plus1:

With track riding, the tires get heated up so much that the air inside inflates which increases pressure, which is why you set it up at a lower pressure to allow for the increase.

So actually, you are not riding with a lower pressure after your tires are heated up enough.

BTW, this thread reminded me....I need to check my tire pressure on my gixxer....
 

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LOL My tires are Nitrogen filled! (Roughly 75 percent nitrogen) as it is in our atmosphere. Can't believe people pay money for air just to get another 25 percent more nitrogen!
 

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LOL My tires are Nitrogen filled! (Roughly 75 percent nitrogen) as it is in our atmosphere. Can't believe people pay money for air just to get another 25 percent more nitrogen!
I used to think the same thing. Then the dealership I worked for got the nitrogen machine in. I put it in my car. The tires do maintain pressures much better and the tire pressure sensor was not on even on the coldest mornings. As a result, I am sold on it for those reasons. However, I still would not pay $80+ to have it put in. I have heard some people say that their cars ride and handle better with it. I think that is the placebo effect myself. Unless, of course, they did a very bad job of checking their tires and for once they were filled properly. I think the biggest benefit of it is getting most of the moisture out of the tire.
 
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