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Discussion Starter #1
so I've introduced myself in the proper 'newbies stop here' spot, and this will be my first real post :bluethum: I'm very much in the learning stage right now (as in learning about bikes, registered for motorcycle safety class) and from what I've read, the SV650 is an okay choice for a first bike (though perhaps at the edge of that definition). I've spent a lot of time on line looking on ebay and cycle trader, etc. at used 650's, and have seen some that are accident rescues and even one that says 'reconstructed' on the title. is it best to stay away from these? maybe it's a dumb question, cuz if it were a car I probably wouldn't be interested. just thought I'd get y'all's feedback...
 

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I recently bought a 2000 Suzuki Bandit 600s, it was on a salvage title. If I had not been so excited about the prospects of my first bike, I more than likely wouldn't have bought it when I found out it had a salvage title. It ran pretty good for my test ride, but the problems began after it was warm and ran for a while. Also a bunch of bolts were missing, or the wrong size, a few things were broken. And the fairings were kind of jerry rigged back onto the bike. I payed 2000 for it which was about 1500 under blue book, because I knew it was going to need work. So far I've spent probably about 700 on fixing it up and replacing parts. It's in the shop right now getting the carbs tuned.

After all this though if I can get the bike running I'll have a decent bike and still a little under blue book. My advice would be to have the bike checked out by a professional shop. Look at everything, nuts, bolts, wiring and if it runs, make sure you get to ride it while it's cold as well as warm. The kicker is I know better, but let my excitement outweigh my judgement. Good luck on the search! Oh, look into any lemon laws that might be applicable in your state/ county. Not sure if they even cover motorcycles, but it doesn't hurt to look.
 

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My advice would be to have the bike checked out by a professional shop. Look at everything, nuts, bolts, wiring and if it runs, make sure you get to ride it while it's cold as well as warm.
+1

Unless you get it super cheap (or you are a mechanic) dont bother with a salvaged bike for your first one. You will probably end up spending about the same amount of money fixing the misc problems as you would have buying a good bike in the first place. Not to mention you have to go through the hassle of taking it to the shop, having them keep it forever and charging you out the butt for labor alone ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
hey guys...thanks for the input! also, how does a bike wear with mileage? I would think that 10k miles on a bike is not like 10k on a car...
 

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bigE is right, 2k of hard riding with some stunting is not the same as using the bike as a daily commuter and having 12k of mileage.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
so I've been doing mad amounts of reading and research...! what are the differences between the SV650 and the S model, other than the aesthetics? the suzuki website indicates that the riding position is different. are there any other differences?
 

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sv650 has less aggressive rearsets and bar-clamp+handlebar for a more standard and upright riding position, and 15/45 sprockets for a tad more acceleration. sv650s has rearsets 1" back and up and clip-ons, along with a bikini fairing. The sprocket ratio is 15/44 or the SVs.

For your first bike I'd get a naked, of if you do get an SVS take off the fairings and put some aftermarket headlights on it and sell the fairings. Most likely you'll drop your first bike, and fairings are expensive.
 

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The early models differed in ergonomics, with the faired model being more aggressive. The later models are the same. Correct me if I'm wrong, SV guys.
 

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That only applies to the rearsets..

99-03, different rearsets IIRC, with the SVs being more aggressive(1inch up and back).
On all years the SVs has clipons instead of clamp on handlebars along with higher gearing.

'99-'02s are carbureted, curvy frames/fairings. These are the first gens.
'03-'08s are fuel injected, boxy frames/fairings, and some other changes.

'03s have a higher subframe(seat is higher) and the mounts on the swingarm for huggers are different.

They're all pretty reliable and have the same performance. The second gen bikes have a couple more HP due to it's fuel injection(73 instead of 71).

Ergonomics would be the only difference in the naked and sport models. I think the naked 1st gen look the best.
 

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The early models differed in ergonomics, with the faired model being more aggressive. The later models are the same. Correct me if I'm wrong, SV guys.
I sat on a 650 and a 650s yesterday. There is a BIG difference in ergo's. The 650 is still much more upright.
 

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I sat on a 650 and a 650s yesterday. There is a BIG difference in ergo's. The 650 is still much more upright.
Now, see, you have to specify if it was because of the handlebars, or the rearsets/footpegs.

Obviously, bar risers+handlebars will lead to a more upright seating position than clip-ons...
 

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I have an 07 's' and I'd definately recommend it, but I agree that you should absolutely get sliders (I got a set for $40 or so). For your 1st bike, reality is you may drop it, or even just lay it over, and fibreglass doesn't like that.

I honestly don't think that new riders should buy new bikes anyways. There are loads who'll disagree, but there's a lot to be learned from synch-ing your own carbs, and changing a clutch cable, etc. Having said that, I'll always love my 1st bike, but the road to the SV has made the prize that much sweeter, it's an awesome bike and if you do end out getting one, you'll love it!:bluethum:
 

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so I've been doing mad amounts of reading and research...! what are the differences between the SV650 and the S model, other than the aesthetics? the suzuki website indicates that the riding position is different. are there any other differences?
I just dug out the brochure for the 07's, and the specs listed in it are as follows:

SV650/SV650S
O/A length 82.1in/81.9in
O/A width 28.7in/29.3in
O/A height 46.1im/42.7in
Ground Clearance 6.1in/5.9in
Wheelbase 56.3in/56.7in
Dry Weight 363lbs/372lbs

Cosmetically, the SV650S has a half fairing, dual 60/55W headlights w/running lights and folding mirrors. the SV560 has a single 60/55 headlight.

This is a CDN book, but I'm sure it's the same in the US... hope this helps...
 

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I just dug out the brochure for the 07's, and the specs listed in it are as follows:

SV650/SV650S
O/A length 82.1in/81.9in
O/A width 28.7in/29.3in
O/A height 46.1im/42.7in
Ground Clearance 6.1in/5.9in
Wheelbase 56.3in/56.7in
Dry Weight 363lbs/372lbs

Cosmetically, the SV650S has a half fairing, dual 60/55W headlights w/running lights and folding mirrors. the SV560 has a single 60/55 headlight.

This is a CDN book, but I'm sure it's the same in the US... hope this helps...
All those dimensional differences are only because the Naked version has a bigger rear sprocket (by 1 tooth) which changes the location of the wheel on the swingarm. The SVs is heavier by 10lbs because of the fairings.


On the SVs, if you drop it, the bar-end will get scratched up, along with breaking the signal stalk(if it bends it will scratch the front fairing). If dropped on the right it will scratch the muffler, on the left I believe your shifter peg will break.

On the naked it's pretty much the same thing, except since the handlbars are wider they receive more of the impact.
 

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All those dimensional differences are only because the Naked version has a bigger rear sprocket (by 1 tooth) which changes the location of the wheel on the swingarm. The SVs is heavier by 10lbs because of the fairings.


On the SVs, if you drop it, the bar-end will get scratched up, along with breaking the mirror stalk(if it bends it will scratch the front fairing). If dropped on the right it will scratch the muffler, on the left I believe your shifter peg will break.

On the naked it's pretty much the same thing, except since the handlbars are wider they receive more of the impact.
to sum it up, don't drop it! :lol4:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
wow - thanks to everyone! all that info is great, and a lot more than I was anticipating!

I am planning on a used bike, because it's cheaper, I can buy better gear/accessories, and if I do drop it, I won't feel as bad. I've been looking at both naked and 's' models, but part of the decision will come down to what is available. I like the look of the naked bike, however.

I've never worked on anything that is carburetted...I know in certain cars they can be higher maintenance...is this the same with motorbikes?

thanks again -
 

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Now, see, you have to specify if it was because of the handlebars, or the rearsets/footpegs.

Obviously, bar risers+handlebars will lead to a more upright seating position than clip-ons...
You are absolutely right. I'll work on my posting etiquette:lol4:

On the S the bars are lower, and I THINK further forward. Pegs are back further. You lay out noticeably more on the S.
 
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