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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I got a Garmin Nuvi 765T for Christmas and have had a chance to put the unit through its paces. This GPS was a very reasonable deal at $200 on Amazon "black Monday". The features include dual bluetooth for running hands-free phone and headphone communications, user-selectable data displays, lifetime FM traffic, lane-assist, and the reason I bought the unit; trip routing with multiple destinations. Other interesting features include a "bicycle" function which avoids major roadways where bicycles are prohibited. It works well for taking more back-roads on the motorcycle as well, but this can result in some wildly circuitous routes.

I have the unit mounted on a RAM mount with the standard Nuvi 7XX series cradle. I may eventually get a waterproof aqua-box6 which works for this unit. So far, what I like is the routing features and selectable data output that lets me choose to see either altitude, time of arrival, time to arrival, time of day distance to destination or direction of travel. The 4.3" screen is bright and remains visible in direct sunlight, but can be obscured by the combination of polarized sunglasses and sunlight. This is a much brighter screen than my older 660.

Routing is easiest to do in MapSource if you have it. Mapsource allows you to set waypoints on any complex route and view nearby gas-stations, stores or other points of interest. I used this to program a group ride scheduled for 1/16 to Alice's Restaurant for our meet-up riding group. This is a complex route that uses back-roads through the Sacramento River Delta to arrive in the Bay Area and cross the San Matteo Bridge to Skyline Blvd, and returns using interesting side-streets through San Francisco, up to Napa and through the remote Capella Valley. I pre-rode the route with the GPS and it guided me nearly flawlessly, but did make an unexpected routing choice at one junction, where I over-rode the recommended route in favor of a shorter distance.

The unit easily uploads and downloads to MapSource and allows the route to be previewed, simulated and revised. I can also create a route file that can be shared with other riders using Garmin units such as the motorcycle friendly units. You can download the breadcrumb trial of your trips and view them on the computer, and print elevation profiles etc. The trip log maintains a running average speed, max speed, time moving time stopped and total distance. Useful for business applications and interesting for MC trips.

On the road, the voice is not very audible over the sound of the bike and wind. This could be overcome using a wired or bluetooth headset. Phone calls are also easy to receive and view on the unit. When approaching complex interstate intersections, the Lane Assist view briefly becomes visible showing exactly where you need to be to navigate a maze of ramps such as the bridge approaches in the Bay Area. The unit always shows the distance to the next turn, and the diretion of the next turn in the upper left corner. Traffic information is displayed below that, and the expected time of any delay. The current speed limit is displayed in the lower left corner, and your current speed is displayed next to that. Zoom in and out buttons are in the upper right and a compass directional arrow is in the lower right along with the map scale. There is a lot of information.

Negatives include the usual complaints that the unit will sometimes take a less-than-ideal route. When you are knowledgeable about local roads, chances are, you can navigate better than a GPS. This unit won't get you lost, but it will take you on a more direct, and sometimes slower route, even when you select "faster time" as a navigation option. I recommend you turn off the avoidance option for traffic. The unit will automatically calculate a detour route when it detects a significant traffic delay. I prefer to make this decision manually, and traffic can be avoided with a simple push of a button.

I will follow up with some pics and more comments after the ride next week. If you're looking for a GPS that can do routes, and is full featured without the cost of the Zumo, this may be your unit.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Review addendum

The Garmin 765T is a full-function routing GPS for under $225. It uploads and downloads from MapSource or compatible gpx file sources, and maintains a track log that can be later viewed for detailed point by point speed, elevation, distance, course and position. On a 372 mile route this past Saturday, it navigated a very complex set of back-roads, freeways and way-points flawlessly. I was road captain for 17 bikes (20 riders) and was able to give my tailgunner detailed turn by turn directions off MapSource. If he had been using a compatible GPS, I could have given him a gpx or gdb file and he could have seen the same route.

This turned out to be a good thing because due to the size of the group, he was separated with another rider twice, and was able to easily rejoin the group by taking a faster route to our next way-point. I should never have lost him, but conditions were less than ideal for a group of this size. I couldn't see the back of the group at times (loose formation, fog, urban riding) and separations happened. I relied 100% on the GPS navigation and did not have to manually override the routing due to funky routing issues you get with with simpler point-A to Point-B navigation units. The entire route could be previewed in MapSource and Google Earth, and the trip log allows me to view in detail 4844 points that detail the trip.

One problem to date: Before leaving on the trip Saturday, the unit began cycling on and off for no apparent reason and would not fully boot. Working with Garmin Support on the phone, they had me reset the unit. This is done by holding the lower right corner of the touch screen as the unit turns on. This brings up a menu confirming whether you want to delete personal data. Well, no I didn't but it was the only way to get the unit to work. This resulted in deleting routes, trip logs, bluetooth settings, and navigation preference settings. Way-points were not deleted, and so I was able to restore routes quickly. I consider this a major inconvenience, and will return the unit under warranty if it happens again.

GPS is visible in this image. I'll have to get some specific photos to show the unit functions.

 

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I got some good info from your posts and am wondering how things are going with the 765T. Am considering it for use on my motorcycle, as I am not too anxious to pay MUCH more for a MC-specific GPS, like the Zumo series.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I had a problem with my first unit where it would not boot up and required a reset fairly frequently. The problem with that was, everytime it was reset, it dumped the waypoints and routes and went back to factor defaults.

Garmin replaced the unit and no problems since. I have plotted routes in several ways. Routing to a destination and from a destination to a return destination with unlimited waypoint vias is one way to do things. Another way is to input the entire route as a loop. The 765T turns out to be pretty smart. If you skip a via-point, or turn the unit off for lunch or a fuel stop, the unit will simply navigate to the next point on the route, but it doesn't forget the missed point, and will continue to route you back to that location after you have finished your plotted route in order. Just be aware of that behavior, so you know when to quit.

The ability to quickly provide miles to a destination, or ETA, travel time, or if you choose elevation and other variables is useful. On a group ride, someone always wants to know "are we there yet?" LOL

This has worked out great. Everyone who sees it wants it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Costco is offering the 765T with lifetime NuMaps for $249. That is a good package deal if you're looking.
 

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I also have the 765t but have not yet mounted it. Used it for a brief time for part of the trip back home from Raleigh - I simply tucked it into my inside jacket pocket and listened to audio through helmet speakers (wired...didn't want to chunk down the big bucks for Cardo).

This summer I'm planning a 4k mile back roads trip and am trying to decide how much to rely on the GPS. It was definitely a bonus simply listening for directions vs looking down at the tank for directions.

I'm looking for advice on mounting and wiring. I've considered simply placing the GPS inside my tank bag vs mounting it to the bars. I don't like the bulky look of some mounts I've seen - I want something clean and simple. Also I have Flanders bars - not stock, but I don't think that will matter too much.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The RAM mounts for the handle bar make a lot of sense, but If you want to run it in the tank bag, that should work for you. I keep mine in the 2D overhead view and can zoom out to see some route options when necessary. On a longer trip, you may want to use it to plan fuel, food and lodging stops. Don't forget you can route your trip precisely, or put in avoids, like freeways and toll roads, or even use the bicycle mode to force it to stay on back roads. It does make for some interesting routing if the shortest distance or time is not your concern.

Keeping the gps visible and being able to use it to display information like altitude, time, ETA and monitor your trip log among other things is fun and useful. I think the handlebar mount is best for that, and of course you can easily remove it if you will be parking, and need to stash the GPS in a trunk or your pocket.

 
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