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Hey guys/gals with black friday around the corner and gps's on sale with huge discounts what would be a good one to get? I been thinkin about a good garmin nuvi, but would like to hear opinions. I am looking to spend under $200.
 

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Anything that isn't waterproof & shock proof is going to have limitations. The Nuvi is solid, but waterproof, it is not. The Zumo is made for bikes, and they're rock solid. And the Zumo screen is made to be operated even with gloves on. Nuvi will be much smaller and somewhat harder to use.

Still, if you only ride in dry might not be bad.
 

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dont go with the cheap Tom Tom...lol... I tried 3 different units on a handle bar mount and they all failed almost immediately. I mean literally stopped working.


Hey guys/gals with black friday around the corner and gps's on sale with huge discounts what would be a good one to get? I been thinkin about a good garmin nuvi, but would like to hear opinions. I am looking to spend under $200.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info thus far. While the Zumo is better for a bike, the price is more than what im looking to spend atm... Quick question about the bluetooth on a gps, is it worth spending the extra money to get it with it? and are there any options not worth extra $$$. Thanks in advance
 

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I've used the Garmin Oregon400T for this entire riding season. No problems whatsoever. The other models of Oregon are OK too, I just got the 400T for the topos since I geocache also. Mounted via RAM products. Can easily be slipped in your pocket when going inside someplace. There's only one external button (power), all the rest use touch screen. Had no problems wearing gloves and operating it.
 

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Anything that isn't waterproof & shock proof is going to have limitations.
Not wanting to hi-jack the thread.....so let's just add an extra dimension:

I'm not a big fan of a lot of "gadgets" on a bike; I think they distract the rider and detract from the purist experience but..........

I would like to have a GPS with an earphone jack, so I could turn the screen WAY down or off, put it in my jacket compartment (intended for an Ipod) and let it talk to me for 6 hours or so.

I have a Magellan now that has bluetooth but haven't tried that since I don't relish having a headset inside my helmet.

So.......I might be in the market for a real inexpensive second unit......if it has an earphone jack and good battery life. Not more than $100.
Anybody have a used one to unload cheap ??? (or know of a cheap new one with earphone) ??
 

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Moved to GPS forum. Take note of the plentiful threads on this topic.
 

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I have tried a few diffrent gps`s over the years and have finnaly found one that im very happy with. Garmin Nuvi 500 or the 550 are very solid performers in the gps market look into them there small, powerfull and yes ``WATERPROOF IPX7`` they also have Topo maps, the best part is you can find them for about $240 new. I originally bought a re-furbished one but had to send 2 of them back due to apperance/wear issues.

https://buy.garmin.com/shop/compare.do?cID=134&compareProduct=13424&compareProduct=27442
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the help thus far this is exactly what im looking for. I not only will use it on the bike but have a jeep that I trail ride with.
 

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I'm leaning toward Garmin Nuvi 765T ($250 from amazon w/free shipping): headphone jack, bluetooth, street names etc. Not sure if I'll mount it to the bike or not. Might still rely mainly on maps and use gps as backup.
 

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I'm leaning toward Garmin Nuvi 765T ($250 from amazon w/free shipping): headphone jack, bluetooth, street names etc. Not sure if I'll mount it to the bike or not. Might still rely mainly on maps and use gps as backup.
I ordered it Friday, and paid $209 and got a $10 discount for using Discover card. Great unit, and its as cheap as refurbished at that price. I strongly recommend a RAM mount. I have been using a Nuvi 660 for 3-years, and it has worked great. This one has the ability to route multiple destinations and has a lot of updated features. Looking forward to delivery about Friday.
 

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I ordered it Friday, and paid $209 and got a $10 discount for using Discover card. Great unit, and its as cheap as refurbished at that price. I strongly recommend a RAM mount. I have been using a Nuvi 660 for 3-years, and it has worked great. This one has the ability to route multiple destinations and has a lot of updated features. Looking forward to delivery about Friday.
I'm looking at possibly getting the 765T from Amazon as well. How do you like yours? Is it everything you dreamed it'd be? Would you recommend it?
 

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Kooter, I just reviewed the unit here.

The Garmin 765T is a full-function routing GPS for under $225. It uploads and downloads from Mapsource or compatible gpx file sources, and maintaines a track log that can be later viewed for detailed point by point speed, elevation, distance, course and position. On a 372 mile route this past Saturday, it navigated a very complex set of back-roads, freeways and waypoints flawlessly. I was road captain for 17 bikes (20 riders) and was able to give my tailgunner detailed turn by turn directions off mapsource. If he had been using a compatible GPS, I could have given him a gpx or gdb file and he could have seen the same route.

This turned out to be a good thing because due to the size of the group, he was separated with another rider twice, and was able to easily rejoin the group by taking a faster route to our next waypoint. I should never have lost him, but conditions were less than ideal for a group of this size. I couldn't see the back of the group at times (loose formation, fog, urban riding) and separations happened. I relied 100% on the GPS navigation and did not have to manually overide the routing due to funky routing issues you get with with simpler point-A to Point-B navigation units. The entire route could be previewed in Mapsource and Google Earth, and the trip log allows me to view in detail 4844 points that detail the trip.

One problem to date: Before leaving on the trip Saturday, the unit began cycling on and off for no apparent reason and would not fully boot. Working with Garmin Support on the phone, they had me reset the unit. This is done by holding the lower right corner of the touch screen as the unit turns on. This brings up a menu confirming whether you want to delete personal data. Well, no I didn't but it was the only way to get the unit to work. This resulted in deleting routes, trip logs, bluetooth settings, and navigation preference settings. Waypoints were not deleted, and so I was able to restore routes quickly. I consider this a major inconvenience, and will return the unit under warranty if it happens again.
 

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I guess it's just me but i find the most inexpensive GPS is a good old map......:lol4: Just saying.....:mrgreen:
 

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I guess it's just me but i find the most inexpensive GPS is a good old map......:lol4: Just saying.....:mrgreen:
Fine for getting around cross country but it's had to beat a GPS for finding a specific address within a city while on the move.
Another nice aspect is they compute arrival time and things like showing you up coming curves in the road and intersections before you can see them (especially nice at night).
They can also divert you away from traffic jams by redirecting your route and will tell you in a voice (of your choice from several) when your exit is coming up.
I found it a great tool along with my road atlas while driving truck, great to have directions while you are driving in an unfamiliar city.
 

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They can also divert you away from traffic jams by redirecting your route
i dont see how folks that cant lane split live without this feature. hell, i can lane split and i still love it.

I guess it's just me but i find the most inexpensive GPS is a good old map
every single smartphone comes with built in voice guidance these days. so if you already own a smartphone you get your turn by turn gps for free. even my old smartphones that no longer have service still work for turn by turn directions as long as i put the address in somewhere i have wifi access. and as and added bonus i have detailed maps of everything in a 150 mile radius of sfbay with me at all times. so i dont need different maps for sailing or trail riding.

on the + for paper maps side. i've yet to have to replace the battery in one. and it still works if i spill my coffee on it. ( well so does my phone but that feature wasnt cheap)
 
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