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Hi, so I just bought a Gsxs750 with 4,000 miles on it, and I had to ride it about 3 hrs home after buying it. I hopped on the highway doing relatively high speeds and eventually noticed that when I tried to go any more than half throttle above 8k rpm in 6th gear the clutch would slip, below 8k it would not. Kept riding because I had to get home but stayed light on the throttle. I pulled over after about an hour of riding to find the clutch lever was way too tight so I corrected it and now no slippage but what has this done to my clutch??
 

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If the clutch operates OK now then you probably did nothing bad to it. Did the lever tighten or was it tight to start with? and by tight I assume you mean the cable was adjusted too tight....giving zero slack. I suspect if this is the case then the linkage got a bit hot and expanded giving zero free play.
 

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If the clutch operates OK now then you probably did nothing bad to it. Did the lever tighten or was it tight to start with? and by tight I assume you mean the cable was adjusted too tight....giving zero slack. I suspect if this is the case then the linkage got a bit hot and expanded giving zero free play.
Yes it was adjusted too tight with zero free play. Sorry if this sounds dumb but what do you mean by the linkage getting hot and expanding? Thank you for the reply
 

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Only time will tell but likely it will be OK if you don't abuse it.
Do you think I should just go ahead and replace the clutch. I don’t want to get stranded or hurt any other parts of the bike by riding after that.
 

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NO. If it ain't broke, don't "fix" it.

You have already observed where slippage shows up first, that is, applying engine power in the higher gears when moving slowly.
As long as you don't see that again, there is no need to waste your money.

It might be a good idea to do an oil change just to clear out any possible debris from clutch wear and to be sure that it has the proper "motorcycle oil" in it. The wrong oil can cause or contribute to slippage too.
 

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Yes it was adjusted too tight with zero free play. Sorry if this sounds dumb but what do you mean by the linkage getting hot and expanding? Thank you for the reply
Ok... there are a couple of ways a motorcycle clutch operates usually it is a rod that presses against a spring loaded plate that then allows the clutch to separate. The rod is pushed throught the pack by one of several methods all of which need a small amount of clearance to avoid the parts touching or rubbing together during use. If that clearance isnt there then the parts can get hot and expand....just as any metal will. This then removes all clearance and, apparantly in your case, allowed the clutch to slip. It doesnt take much for a clutch to slip...esp at hight loads and speed.
 
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