Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've heard of some people taking the MSF courses and having their licenses stamped for endorsement upon completion of the final test. Does this apply in all states? I'm really looking forward to the course and will be taking it regardless, but it would be really sweet if I could get endorsed by the people who train me rather than through some DMV test site.

- dizzy
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,860 Posts
No, not all states offer that. They should, though.
 

·
Still crazy after all these years
Joined
·
14,185 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
So I've heard of some people taking the MSF courses and having their licenses stamped for endorsement upon completion of the final test. Does this apply in all states? I'm really looking forward to the course and will be taking it regardless, but it would be really sweet if I could get endorsed by the people who train me rather than through some DMV test site.

- dizzy
Took the MSF course 2 months ago in NJ & got my license stamped. I'm not for more goverment rules & regulations but I think they should make this course a requirement before you can get a license.
44pac
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Great news and thanks for the tips fellas! I can't wait to take the course! It'll definitely be the first thing on my list of tasks to complete in the Spring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,464 Posts
OK, I see you are from ohio. Yes ohio offers the MSF riders course, both basic and experienced. Once you complete the basic course they give you a completion card, you take it to DMV, pay for a new license and they give you the cool little M on a new license-by the way that little M will cost you like $20. Any ways in this post I have the MSF course listings for ohio-check it out and do as you will with it
Motorcycle Safety Foundation
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,376 Posts
They stamped me in Illinois. I stamped em right back. Handcuffs hurt, by the way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
In the old days (mid-70s), at least in North Carolina, all you needed was a driver's license. The salesperson taught you the basics in the dealership parking lot. Now, in Colorado, upon successful completion of the MSF course, you're handed a signed card which you take to DMV. Then, for $3.00, you get a new driver's license with an M endorsement.
 

·
M-J Member of the Month!!
Joined
·
2,758 Posts
In North Carolina the MSF course will exempt you from having to take the ridding portion of the DMV test. The written portion will still have to be taken. North Carolina does have a "Learner's Permit" for motorcycle. You take the written portion of the test to get it. You cannot ride a passenger until you go back to get your endorsement. There are plenty of people who refuse to get a motorcycle endorsement even though the written and ridding tests are easy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Once you pass the course in Wisconsin, you can get your M endorsement and you're free to ride. You can get a 6-month permit and then take the road test if you don't want to go through the course. I highly recommend the course however!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
In North Carolina the MSF course will exempt you from having to take the ridding portion of the DMV test. The written portion will still have to be taken. North Carolina does have a "Learner's Permit" for motorcycle. You take the written portion of the test to get it. You cannot ride a passenger until you go back to get your endorsement. There are plenty of people who refuse to get a motorcycle endorsement even though the written and ridding tests are easy.
A little old now, but thanks for this. I'm taking the MSF course soon, this helps clear up the course/dmv relationship.
 

·
Still crazy after all these years
Joined
·
14,185 Posts
In California, you only get waived the practical test in the DMV to get your license. You still have to take the written test to get the M2 license..
Oh, like that's a major problem ... :fight2:

If you fail that idiot test then you REALLY have no business being in traffic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Comparing the states.
I recently took the MSF course and got the endorsement to get my license in Oklahoma.
Our course was 2 days and we never left the parking lot. It did go through the basics
but unless you hit the street with the students, go out on a highway somewhere,
so some emergency braking.... You really haven't accomplished anything.

Anyway, I lived in Texas the previous decade and took a 3 week long class, 3 days a week down there. Never got my endorsement due to loosing a job down there but I must say the Texas course I went through there was much better. We hit the streets,
we climbed platforms and did U turns and came back down, we did emergency stops, we talked about laying down bikes in curves and what to do in a crash, we went out on the interstates then we did the whole thing over again at night just so we got night experience. Went over sand and gravel. They just covered everything to the point I was ready to ride then.

And all I can say of that 2 day course I got in Oklahoma is, well,,, how much do you value your life???? To me, I would have ,, well. Even the instructor was defending
Oklahoma's no helmet law.

It's just different. Don't know that I really care for it. I think if Oklahoma were giving away licenses with every box of cereal sold, it would have about the same effect on public safety.

Well, that's my opinion.

Charlie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Most military installations offer it to Active duty, dependents and some even offer it to municipal workers for free. The DOD mandates everyone completes the course prior to riding on base, in the NAVY and Marine Corps it is required to be taken every three years, the Coast Guard requires everyone except civilian employees to take it whether you ride on base or not, not sure about the ARMY and AIR FORCE policies beyond the initial course for people who ride on base, and now the DOD requires an additional sport bike course for those who ride them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
370 Posts
Yep, I just got back from being stationed up at Camp Lejeune where they were doing courses pretty much all month long. I didn't know how many Marines drove ricers until then. They had to take a special sport bike course. Luckily, they never found out about my gsxr600.. got rid of it now
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
370 Posts
Not to mention, Navy and Marine Corps Installations have very strict rules when it comes to motorcycle safety. They require full gear (helmet, gloves, jacket, riding pants, boots) and a safety vest with your ID visible on the outside. If these aren't followed, you can permanantly lose your motorcycle privileges on base
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top