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hello,
I decided to get a motorcycle; I got my appt for my training school soon to get my M1. I’ve read a few forums and what some people suggest to other people. I’m 5’10 about 180-190 pounds and 22. At first the new 2007 CBR 125r appealed to me but because, a few reasons was that its small I can easily control it and won’t be intimidated by its size and it’s also cheap. At the same time I don’t want to be teased and taunted by fellow riders that saying it has a lawnmower engine in it or their bmx has bigger tires therefore I was also looking into a 2004-05 CBR 600. It’s a bigger bike, suits me well, I wont stick out in it and in terms of the speed ill never complain its to slow. But regardless I never plan to ride fast I just want a bike to ride to my buddies houses, ride downtown a bit nothing crazy. So I don’t know which one to pick cbr 125 or maybe a 2005 aprilia rs 125, it’s a bigger bike looks nicer compared the cbr 125 minus the power the 600 would have. So what do you guys suggest? I just want to play it safe that’s all, at the same time want to pick a decent bike....a nice one? any help anyone???
 

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I suggest you stay the hell off of the 600 until you have a some experience in the saddle. Get a 125 or 250. You can still do stupid crap on small bikes but they are way more forgiving.
 

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i'm guessing you're in ontario (canada), since you say M1. be careful with your age - the insurance companies will happily rape you for rates.

find out what your rates would be on a kawasaki ninja 250 - that might be all you can comfortably pay as far as insurance is concerned. i'm 32, so my rate for a nasty-arse ZX-9R isn't so bad, but you'd get HOSED with a bike like that.

the cbr125 is a pretty good idea, i think, and i wouldn't worry too much about not having enough power if you're just gonna stay in town. with today's gas prices, it'll be WAY better than a 600cc or even a 250cc. if you plan on hitting the highway, the cbr125's sales brochure SHOULD give you a laugh (120km/h max speed depending on wind, or some such thing)

some bikes to look at:
honda cbr125 (keep it in mind)
kawi ninja 250
suzuki gs / gsx 500


if your friends are gonna tease and taunt you about your bike, get different riding buddies. unless, of course, they're willing to buy the nicer bike for you and pay for its insurance....
 

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yup, that's the one i was thinking about. similar stylling to a GSX-R but more tame. i've seen a few around town here.

i think the biggest issue with you getting a motorbike is "male, under 25" when it comes to in$$$urance. if it wasn't for that, there'd be a lot more bikes worthy of consideration (honda 599 or cbr600f4i [maybe], suzuki sv650s, kawasaki 650r, yamaha yzf600 [maybe], etc).
 

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I wouldnt touch any sport bike over 500 cc's as a first bike. Not only for the cost of insurance but without necessary experience you're asking to get hurt.

Stick with a 250 or a 500, take the MSF course and wear your gear.
 

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ya, agreed, though for some stupid reason there isn't much in the 250cc - 500cc range in north america, at least in the sport / standard range.

dave - you could also consider a dual-sport bike. a bit more tough and you could hit some dirt roads for a change of scenery. there's a decent number of them in the 200cc / 250cc / 400cc range. like, for example, suzuki dr-z400 (there's 2 versions, one of which gives you street rubber)
 

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it's brand new, so i don't know if anyone has actually tried one. also, not sure if it's even available in the USA (where most of the forumites are from)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
its available here in canada, i just find the tires super skinny im not sure how that would be handling?
 

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last time i checked, my road bicycle has 20mm wide tires front and back, and it handles RAZOR sharp. fatter tires are needed for heavier bikes and putting engine power to the pavement, so for a lighter less powerful bike like the cbr125 and gs500f they should be fine.
 

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i'm guessing you're in ontario (canada), since you say M1.
In California (the other "CA"), we also have the distinctions between M1 (regular motorcycles) and M2 (mopeds, scooters, etc.).
 

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For the record ... skinny tires make the bike more eager (and easier) to lean into curves, where a wider tire makes it harder to lean. If you are planning to ride mostly twisty roads (and have lots of fun), don't worry about the skinny tires. If you are going to spend most of your time going in a straight line, then wider tires may be more comfortable.

And as for what other people may think ... "F" them. Even if you are riding a 125, there will be guys that will give you that sad look - the look that says exactly what they are thinking - "I wish I was riding that, but the old ball-and-chain will rip me a new a-- for even thinking about it!". Anyone who laughs about you riding a 125 is either a poseur (owns a big bike, but spends more time polishing than riding) or never rode one themselves.
 

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Ok here it is again!!!!!.....

Buying a bike?
by Jim McCraw/Popular Mechanics /July 2005
I think this is how you borrow what someone else says.

Nobody really has to buy a motorcycle. But these days plenty of people want to. And you may be one of them. Before you plunk down your money, swing your leg over the seat and feel that warm breeze of freedom, you need to resolve several critical issues.

AM I AN EXPERINCED RIDER? Riding a motorcycle is undeniably fun. It also can be lethal if done wrong. Therefore, before you even consider buying any kind of motorcycle, assess your skills and abilities. If you’re a rank novice, you need to learn how to ride. If you’ve been away from motorcycles for awhile, you should take a refresher course. And if you don’t already have a motorcycle license, you’re going to need one to ride legally. The best course of action is to go to a riding school.

HOW DO I INTEND TO RIDE? The kind of riding you’re interested in fairly well dictates the type of bike you should shop for. Conversely, the kind of bike you ride largely defines your motorcycling world and lifestyle. So besides selecting the motorcycle based on its mechanical and performance attributes, consider what circles you’ll likely be riding in—so to speak. If you don’t think of yourself as a racer or a biker in the WILD ONE vein, and you would be comfortable at, say, an Eagles reunion concert, consider a traditional bike, on the other hand, tend to indulge in extreme activities—think THE FAST AND THE FERIOUS, only on two wheels. If you want to hang with the hip-hop crowd, maybe you’re a sport-bike candidate. Folks who enjoy the touring lifestyle tend to be older—often retirees—and are in on kind of hurry when they watch the scenery go by on all sides. If an RV lifestyle or dinner theater appeals to you, so might a touring bike. But if you want to put some adventure into a long daily commute, you may be cruiser-bike material.

HOW MUCH SHOULD I SPEND? It’s a discretionary purchase—the mortgage comes first, okay? Depending on the type of motorcycle you choose, you can expect to pay anywhere from $5000.00 to $25000.00 for a new bike. Motorcycle dealers, like auto dealers will do what they can to help you with financing options, and many offer used bikes as well.

DO I REALLY NEED A NEW BIKE? For many riders, a used motorcycle is a better option. Besides being more affordable than a new bike, a used one is a sensible transitional machine. You may find that the bike you bought to get you back in the game is somehow lacking after you’ve spent some serious time on it. And the reality is, sooner or later your first motorcycle is going to hit the pavement. There’s no reason that the bike you ding up needs to be an expensive one right out the crate. Give yourself a few months to get comfortable—then you’ll be more than ready for a new set of wheels.

IS THIS THE BIKE FOR ME? As you shop, consider your body type: if you cannot put both feet flat on the ground when the bike is upright, it’s too tall for you, period. Also, if this is your first bike, or you’ve never ridden anything scarily fast, don’t even look at a high-performance bike. That said, if you see yourself using the bike primarily as daily transportation, consider a standard, or traditional, bike. If you used to ride years ago, these will look familiar, but feel better thanks to electric starters, fuel injection and disc brakes. If your commute is a long one, you typically do it with a passenger and you want a bit more style, the next logical choice is a cruiser. If you intend to spend many hours and miles in the saddle with a passenger setting behind you, you need a touring bike. For a little more performance in a touring bike, there’s a subset called sport/touring. If you primarily want to straighten curvy roads, your needs will be best met with a sportbike. If you want a basic commuter that can keep going when the pavement doesn’t, look at a dual-purpose bike: a standard bike with extra ground clearance and knobby tires.

WHAT ELSE DO I NEED? Before you start riding, you’ll require a helmet, jacket, gloves, boots, rain suit and, possibly, dedicated eyewear—especially if you wear glasses. Don’t stint when you buy your riding outfit: should you ever need it, it’s all there is between you and the hard, coarse pavement. Buy a helmet that meets both DOT {Department of Transportation} and Snell Memorial Foundation’s current safety standards, nothing less.
Then, after you’re fully trained and equipped, prepare for adversity. Expose yourself to what you’re bound to face eventually when riding in a safe and controlled environment. While you may never intend to ride in the rain, sooner or later you’re going to get caught in a shower. Go to an empty parking lot or deserted stretch of road on a rainy morning to get yourself used to the feel of wet pavement and how the bike reacts to breaking, accelerating and swerving in the wet. These are skills you don’t want to have to learn on the job.
 

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I followed the advise of the members here and steered away from an 'R' bike for my first go on two wheels. After looking at my options I went with the SV650S. It has plenty of power, the styling of a sport bike, and not the "little" look you talked about. Mine is an '02, she had less than 8000mi on the odometer and I payed $3000 for it. Oh, I'm a 24 year old male and my insurance is $200 a year.
Here she is that cold day I brought her home.
 

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hello,
I decided to get a motorcycle; I got my appt for my training school soon to get my M1. I’ve read a few forums and what some people suggest to other people. I’m 5’10 about 180-190 pounds and 22. At first the new 2007 CBR 125r appealed to me but because, a few reasons was that its small I can easily control it and won’t be intimidated by its size and it’s also cheap. At the same time I don’t want to be teased and taunted by fellow riders that saying it has a lawnmower engine in it or their bmx has bigger tires therefore I was also looking into a 2004-05 CBR 600. It’s a bigger bike, suits me well, I wont stick out in it and in terms of the speed ill never complain its to slow. But regardless I never plan to ride fast I just want a bike to ride to my buddies houses, ride downtown a bit nothing crazy. So I don’t know which one to pick cbr 125 or maybe a 2005 aprilia rs 125, it’s a bigger bike looks nicer compared the cbr 125 minus the power the 600 would have. So what do you guys suggest? I just want to play it safe that’s all, at the same time want to pick a decent bike....a nice one? any help anyone???
Those who would ridicule you for being sensible have no business on a bike anyway. Get some new friends to hang out with.
 

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wow that honda cbr 125 looks cool wish we had those here in the states!
BikePics - 2004 Honda CBR 125
yeah dont worry about what others think, im over 6ft 240 lbs and i started on a 92 nighthawk 250....not the coolest bike, not the fastest, but it was reliable and I lived to work my way up (slowly) to a 1200cc bike. had i started on a bike like this i would have probably been killed. and from experience i can tell you that its really fun to go FAST on a slow bike.
I remember quite a few times going on rides with friends who had big fast bikes, and of course going UP the mountain roads they were usually a bit further ahead of me, but going DOWN them was a completely different story. No matter what you do, stay save and HAVE FUN!
 
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