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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
TLDR: I want to operate a motorcycle out of the state of my permanent residence.

Hello, like the title says I am nomadic and I haven't had a lease in years. I am currently residing in Brooklyn, NYC and my latest urge to get a motorcycle has been greater than urges previous. Before I get to the inevitable question I want to say I have over a decade of street cycling (road bike) experience so I am aware how dangerous city riding is in general and after getting my motorcycle license last Summer I've come to an understanding/respect for how motorcycling is different and exciting.

My permanent residence is Delaware and I'd rather not change that just so I can ride a motorcycle in NYC. I don't know how long I'll be in NYC but I would like to try owning a motorcycle. I don't plan on popping wheelies or riding at super fast speeds, I only want to get around the boroughs faster by avoiding public transit.

My question is, is it naive to think I can buy a motorcycle in Delaware, inspect/register it and then ride it 3.5 hours to NYC when I am not experienced with highway riding? I would rather not to be honest but it sounds like the only other way is to rent a Uhaul truck and transport the bike to the city.

Anyone have any experience with owning a bike out of state?
 

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IF.....you do other "transactions" from your address in Delaware and have some means to get mail there AND still have a Delaware drivers license......I don't see a problem with buying something locally and registering it at your "permanent" address.
Just don't mention at ANY TIME in the purchase process that you don't actually live there.
There might be some extra taxes for an out of state purchase.

As for a long ride, you should NOT do that in a high speed freeway, at least not most of the way.
That might turn it into a 6 hour ride.
And NOT good to do that in the peak of the summer heat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
IF.....you do other "transactions" from your address in Delaware and have some means to get mail there AND still have a Delaware drivers license......I don't see a problem with buying something locally and registering it at your "permanent" address.
Just don't mention at ANY TIME in the purchase process that you don't actually live there.
There might be some extra taxes for an out of state purchase.

As for a long ride, you should NOT do that in a high speed freeway, at least not most of the way.
That might turn it into a 6 hour ride.
And NOT good to do that in the peak of the summer heat.
That all sounds reasonable but one still needs to have a bike inspected before you can hit the road with it. This means I need to have the bike physically present in the state its registered, a 2 hour drive away. Sounds like your recommendation is to transport the bike regardless of where I purchased it via truck back to Brooklyn instead of riding it there.
 

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That all sounds reasonable but one still needs to have a bike inspected before you can hit the road with it.
That is NOT a requirement everywhere.
If it IS in the state where you will register it, then you are just gonna have to deal with it.
 

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I dont understand what the problem is. Here in Au if I buy a bike where I am....ie not my permanent residence then I can still ride the bike in other states if I do not intend to live in those states. The only problem I can see is getting any renwal notices....however this isnt an insurmountable problem simply put your renwal address as a post office box number in the state you currently ride in.

I suppose, in the USA, if you have to live in the state the machine is registered in then that becomes the problem.
 

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I suppose, in the USA, if you have to live in the state the machine is registered in then that becomes the problem.
BINGO.
No State wants to allow you to pay your $27 per year to ANOTHER state if they can help it.
Not having a "brick and mortar" residence with a mailing address is a problem in other ways too.
 
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