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Discussion Starter #1
I decided to upgrade my suspension this winter on the SV. I put a 2005 ZX6 rear shock in and it is soooo much nicer than the stock shock (no more pogo stick effect). It only cost me $50 ($40 for shock and $10 for misc hardware from ACE). I recommend it to anyone dissatisfied with the stock shock. For more info see:
The Kawi 636/GSXR/Busa Shock Install and The How to NOT cut the battery box. - SVRider Board

I am also going to put stiffer springs and thicker oil in the forks, but havent done it yet cause the weather got nice again after the rear shock install. I'll let ya'll know how that works out.

B4


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Nice! I love cheap upgrades as a result of someone else's expensive one. My Hayabusa rear cost me $38. :)
 

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I am also going to put stiffer springs and thicker oil in the forks, but havent done it yet cause the weather got nice again after the rear shock install. I'll let ya'll know how that works out.
OK, I just gotta ask.

All shocks are not created equal but a spring is just a spring.

Unless you are putting a large "load" on the bike, why would you want stiffer springs?? Trying to get back that pogo-stick effect that you just lost ?? :mrgreen:
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
The springs in the SV forks are soft. Which results in a "jumpy" front end in corners that are anything but silky smooth; it also is fairly easy to bottom out the forks. I'm not putting really stiff springs in the forks, just stiffer ones that are better for some one of my weight. I'm using a thicker fork oil to get better dampening....
 

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... a spring is just a spring.
Oh, I beg to differ. It's very important to keep sag and suspension action in the appropriate area. Many sporty riders install springs suitable to their weight. You just don't have enough adjustment with preload alone many times.

Then there's the whole other issue of constant-rate vs. progressive winding.
 

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Oh, I beg to differ. It's very important to keep sag and suspension action in the appropriate area. Many sporty riders install springs suitable to their weight. You just don't have enough adjustment with preload alone many times.

Then there's the whole other issue of constant-rate vs. progressive winding.
+1

Springs can be as different as shocks, my friend.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I've been riding around with the new springs in for a few hundred miles now and they are great! The extra dampening the thicker oil provides is much better than stock. The forks really soak up small to medium bumps and the large bumps aren't any more jarring than they were before... The stiffer springs really reduce brake dive too which is nice.
 

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It has to be a lot better than the mash potatoes they put under the sv from the factory.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yeah mine was extra mashed too with 25k+ miles on it; 10k of which I left on the 2nd lowest preload setting cause I didnt know any better
 

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yea I am looking at new springs up front and a new rear shock this coming winter. It is ok for now. I threw some spacers in the front to increase preload and the rear is highest setting and that works good I just hated the front end dive on braking! She squats and scoots and gives a lot more feedback than stock so for $3 I am VERY happy.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yeah, springs cost more than the rear shock! I got mine from RaceTech for $90 something shipped. Not a bad deal... I think they have some progressive SV springs on eBay for $65ish.... Put some 15 or 20w oil in there. It will help a lot and costs about $12.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Your info says you have a SV1000S. Dont they have compression, rebound, and preload adjustment??
 

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They do seem to be adjustable. They have screws on the top of each fork that says "H<---->S" I assume this means hard and soft but with no experience with suspension tuning, I am leary of turning anything if I am unaware of the result. (skeered of screwing something up), if you will.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I would learn how to tune the suspension before you spend money and time on changing the oil.

IIRC the screws on top of the fork cap are rebound adjustment, the screws on the bottom of the fork leg are compression dampening, and the fork cap itself should be a hex shape so you can adjust preload. Having a properly adjusted suspension will make a world of difference in how the bike rides. I know on svrider.com there are links to SV manuals....
 

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Found a suspension tuning video online and after correcting front sag, rebound and compression and rear rebound, the bike is handling WAY better. Actually cut brake dive in half too. The rear was pretty close. A little stiff but I frequently have my wife on back so I left the preload as is but the front was outta whack pretty bad. Set it up like I thought it should be then took it out for some testing and tweaking and got it dialed in. I was dissapointed in the SV suspension when I bought it but now it is alot more responsive and actually rides better too.
 

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Don't be afraid to make adjustments to the rebound and compression. Make sizable changes and see how it effects it. (Write down where you start from and changes made in case you forget what you did.) Over time, you will get it dialed in to where you like it the best. Usually, you will have to make some concessions though. Usually the best setting to make the best times on the track or on a quick ride down you favorite road will beat you up on very long rides. With tinkering, you will find where it works best for you.

Sport Rider has recomended suspension settings. If you weigh close to what they do, you could try their settings if you are not happy with the settings other than the preload (since you have that already).It would give you a point to start from if nothing else. http://www.sportrider.com/suspension_settings/146_suggested_suspension_settings/suzuki.html
 

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Got a few rides on the new setup and so far so good. It just feels alot more balanced now instead of spongy in the front and stiff in the back. Reduced brake dive and improved cornering (especially while braking and accelerating). Thanks for everyone's help. Thanks to the instructional video I found online, I'm not afraid to dive in and make the needed adjustments. I think I can get by without a spring upgrade or GSXR swap now since the only riding I do is on the street, not the track.
 
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