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Any Rotella 5w40 syn users out there have any issues with oil consumption?
My last change was about 2500 miles ago, there are no leaks anywhere, during a routine inspection, I found the crankcase about a quart and a half low. I have been
commuting 70 miles round trip for about the last 6 weeks with no (other) noticeable issues.
 

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Sounds like you should check the oil level more often. That aside, both our bikes run with Rotella 15-40 dino with very little oil useage. My Vstrom used half a cup over a 3000 km ride in June. I don't think the M-50 uses that much but will soon find out. Lynda is headed out in the morning for a 5000 km trip. She will be carrying 4 little bottles(just a few ounces each) for topping up if need be.
I did use Amsoil at one time and the Vstrom used some but not enough to sweat about.
 

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I found the crankcase about a quart and a half low.
Wow. I'd be worried about that.

But you need to mentally review your last change and your present level checking proceedure first.

I would hope that some pilot error is involved........because burning a quart and a half in less than 3K miles does NOT sound good.
 

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but, as my truck owners' manual states "some vehicles use more oil than others."

Still, I suspect anything over 1/2 quart in 2 - 3,000 miles excessive with synthetic.

Heck, the only way I can tell when it's time to change oil is the shifting gets a bit sticky; then after about a week with new oil, the bike shifts better again.

Without any discernable use of oil.
 

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Still, I suspect anything over 1/2 quart in 2 - 3,000 miles excessive with synthetic.
Why do you qualify that by saying "with synthetic" ??

Do you still believe that urban legand about synthetic leaking more ?? :whistle:

I ran mine last season with Mobil 1 for about 3,500 miles and didn't need to add a drop.
 

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but, as my truck owners' manual states "some vehicles use more oil than others."

Still, I suspect anything over 1/2 quart in 2 - 3,000 miles excessive with synthetic.

Heck, the only way I can tell when it's time to change oil is the shifting gets a bit sticky; then after about a week with new oil, the bike shifts better again.

Without any discernable use of oil.
Business as usual with a Buell in fine working order.
 

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Do you still believe that urban legand about synthetic leaking more ?
What I believe is, if you take an old high mileage car, synthetic oil may find ways to leak around stuff.

Starting to think those cars would have to be pretty old and very high mileage; and already burning some oil with regular stuff.
 

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What I believe is, if you take an old high mileage car, synthetic oil may find ways to leak around stuff.

Starting to think those cars would have to be pretty old and very high mileage; and already burning some oil with regular stuff.
Can't really agrue with that.

I've heard reports that leakage might increase dramatically if you try to flush out all the sludge in an old engine too.
Seems that the sludge actually plugs some leaks.
 

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starting to come around to the train of thought that with most cars these days, the main source of "burning oil" is shot valve seals.
 

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starting to come around to the train of thought that with most cars these days, the main source of "burning oil" is shot valve seals.
Can't argue with that either.

It's often pretty easy to tell though......as oil runs DOWN when the engine is shut off.

If there is a puff of blue smoke when first started cold, that's a dead give-away.......as oil won't run UP past worn rings.

Now, if you have an engine with horizontal pistons, it gets a little trickier !! :roll:
 

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like BMW motorcycles, Porsche with their flat sixes or the old venerated VW?

Don't really believe "sludge" plugs anything; if anything, sludge merely slows / stops the flow of oil to critical engine components.

Engine sludge and engine sludging occur (to my belief) where the engine runs hot / hottest and the regular oil simply fries like bacon.

Which brings me to my next belief, modern engines were not designed for regular oil.

By modern, heck, you can go back 15 - 20 years on that one.

My 1980 yahama ran better on synthetic, and if anybody told me that a couple years before I changed, they might have got some pretty funny looks.

Now, regular oil is good enough for the lawn mower, but not anything I value.
 

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Don't really believe "sludge" plugs anything; if anything, sludge merely slows / stops the flow of oil to critical engine components.
Yet if it accumulated, it wouldn't stop a tiny leak in a non-pressurized gasket ??

You have some "interesting" beliefs.......and some really incomplete information.

By definition, sludge isn't "sludge" until it stops flowing. :mrgreen:
 

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Kind of a hijack but not really...still in the spirit of the topic.

InRe: New oil in an old sludge infested engine. I've heard that the detergents in new oils break down the sludge and whatnot in an engine. If you've stayed on top of your oil changes and maintenance you'll be fine, but if you take an engine that you're unsure of it's provenance, an oil change could, in theory, rip away the "sludge scabs" so to speak and create problems. I.E. oil leaks. Given that logic, the problems were always there, just ignored? I can understand that, but why do some mechanics advise not to change the oil in an leaky engine? Just add to it as it gets low. Wouldn't the detergents do the same thing?

In the same vein...what about Auto Transmissions? Is there really a varnish that spreads the ________? IIRC, I've been told gears, but that would be damn near impossible, no? And consequently, fresh fluid's detergents eats that varnish, leaves a space, that allows the Trans. to slip. I don't buy it, but it's vaguely logical.....Or is a slipping Trans. more a function of old fluid thinning out, and not providing the same hydraulic pressure as fresh fluid?
 

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automatic transmissions need changing mostly because fine metal grit builds up and eventually the baffle gets saturated.

Along with the magnet on the bottom of the pan.

As far as Easy's comments, true enough, not a mech for a living, but I still hold the line that engines built the last 20 years were pushing the limits of regular oil. Chrysler 2.7 liter engines (in my opinion) didn't have a problem with sludging insofar as they should have been using synthetic oil because regular oil was literally being fried - most probably due to poor design and insufficient field testing.
 

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don't know if there is a bad synthetic, some must be better than others - calls for SAE to create another standard seeing as they are at SM and everybody meets that with the schmutz they put in a bottle now.

and going back to automatic transmissions, subaru has been using an actual filter vs the baffle that GM (among others) has been using for decades.
 

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Synthetic oil

I'd bet anything this question is a repeated repeat, but I can't find the thread. I have an '06 C 50 Limited, at what point (mileage) should I change to synthetic oil and why? Some guys also say they use automotive synthetic in their bikes, doesn't sound right, is this an option:lol4:?
You can use synthetic oil when the engine is brand new. I think you are referring to high mileage oil, that should not be used in motorcycles with wet clutches, because it can cause slippage.
 

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You can use synthetic oil when the engine is brand new. I think you are referring to high mileage oil, that should not be used in motorcycles with wet clutches, because it can cause slippage.
Nope and nope. :mrgreen:

While you CAN use synthetic from the start, the conventional wisdom is to AT LEAST let it go to the recommended first change......some say second change.
This on the "theory" that you need dino oil to get a proper break-in. Largely an urban myth, I think.......but I wait anyway. :roll:

It is not "high mileage" oil that causes clutch slippage. That term is used on oils designed for use in old, high mileage engines.
The problem is with "energy conserving" oil (that is supposed to increase gas mileage slightly) because of the super-slippery additives, usually Moly.

Oh, and welcome to the fourm !! :bluethum:
 

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Many performance cars come from the factory with synthetic oil in the engines. Perhaps they know something no one else knows. In my opinion waiting some period of time to make the change to synthetic is one of those old wives tales you hear repeted over and over. I have changed to synthetic oil at my first oil change (around 600 miles) with no negetive results on all my last few new bikes. I am not one of those who will call anyone who disagrees with my opinion stupid so just do what is comfortable for you and ignore the others.
 
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