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Just trying to understand. You mention "common sense" but really you're talking about experience. It takes experience to know what pressure does to traction and wear.

But you never really said anything specific. "Use common sense" doesn't really tell us much. Share the wisdom! What exactly do you do?
 

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No long rant, I never said to set it to maximum, said I would read the specs on the tire, and just use good ole common sense as to temp. weight and so forth, .........
And that so-called "good ole common sense" leads you to conclude exactly WHAT when it comes to the tire pressures on YOUR bike ?? And how does your conclusion compare to the bike Mfg's recommendation AND the tire Mfg's max. recommendation (since that is the only pressure given ON the tire)??

Some of us are kind of dense.........and may not have a lot of good ole common sense.......so we need specifics. :bluethum:
 

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Common sense tells me that the Suzuki spec in the manual called for 32 psi front, 36 psi rear for the oem tires, of which I got over 12,000 great suzuki miles. The Metzeler 880 spec calls for 38-40 front, 40-42 rear for the "Best performance of the Tire" shown in the Metzeler manual. So I do what any educated, informed person would do, and research the forums, called Suzuki, and Metzeler to get answers. So after shelling out over $350+ for the 880's, I will follow their guidelines for their tires, just common sense to me and my wallet (that is my opinion). As to experience, I have two bikes, now 40 years old and a 38 year old Suzuki that I have had since new that still run like new by following common sense and researching help and opinions when needed. Stuff like changing a oil filter every 10,600 miles or 3rd oil change per Suzuki just isn't common sense to me (another opinion). I don't think anyone in these forums wants anything but good old common sense solutions to keeping their bike going, as easy, economical and correct for as long as possible. If my opinion helps someone, than great, it has worked for me for at least 40 years. And if others come up with their own solutions, I will continue to be open minded to their answers. I think most people can weed out the differences between smarty opinion answers, and ones that actually help solve problems, I think I can. Bottom line is we are all after the same thing. After all, owning, riding and maintaining a bike is a common ground we all share.
 

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The Metzeler 880 spec calls for 38-40 front, 40-42 rear for the "Best performance of the Tire" shown in the Metzeler manual.
OK, I think we are getting close finally. How do those spec's compare to what is "written" on the sidewall of the tire(s) ??

Common sense tells us that not everybody has/wants/can afford Metzelers.
A little experience tells us that most tire manufacturers don't even publish recommended pressures, except for the max. stamped on the sidewall.

So, the question IS, and always has been: Given only the bike mfg's recommendation and the MAX. pressure on the sidewall (which is all most people have to go by), just exactly what kind of "common sense" does one apply to come up with pressures that are different than what is in the bike owner's manual ??

This is, after all, what started the discussion in the first place:

"I have no owners maual to refer to, but both the front and back tire have 41 lbs Cold stamped into the tire... is that correct? seems a bit odd to have 41 lbs. But then again I'm a nube."

Common sense tells me that you can't expect somebody like this to come up with a tire manufacturer's recommendations when he doesn't even have the owner's manual for his bike. :roll:

AND....and.....the issue was completely resolved in the first 5 replies. Then things took a wrong turn........... :eek:oops:
 

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Metzeler has complete specs and recommendations on line, wish Suzuki had the same. Do your homework online as I did and you can find the same answers I did. Or call Metzeler direct (Phone listed in webstite and talk to them yourself). Their manual is there for all to view that are concerned or interested. Experience tells me that anyone that can read these post has no excuse to not look for themselves. They have a computer and the internet that will direct them to the answers. Maximum stamped on the tires means just that.....so I researched further myself to get answers to the question you just posed, not opinions. Their specs are published online and hard copy, both of which I have. If a tire manufacturer wont publish recommended pressures, they may be ducking the question that started this entire post. Good luck
 

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Ducking the question, or simply opting not to spend millions field-testing every vehicle they fit?
 

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Ducking the question, or simply opting not to spend millions field-testing every vehicle they fit?
Common sense tells me that every mfg. is not going to spend the money.

And a little more common sense tells me that MOST riders aren't gonna take the time to look it up, no matter how easy it appears to be to some of us.

It appears that you and I are in perfect agreement on a couple of subjects the past few days. This worrys me a bit......... :shock: :mrgreen: :bluethum:
 

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Now that this situation is settled (yah right), lets here from those that support the Suzuki oil filter schedule published in the Suzuki owners manual, this might get even more interesting than the tire pressure question, and probably due for a completely new post.

I'm all ears and eyes. For those that do not have a VL800 manual, Suzuki says to change the filter at 600 miles, skip the next two changes, and change it at 11,000 miles. What
does common sense tell us about this?............
 

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It appears that you and I are in perfect agreement on a couple of subjects the past few days. This worrys me a bit......... :shock: :mrgreen: :bluethum:
You're learnin'. :mrgreen:

Tbone, at the risk of suffering your common sense's wrath, I don't altogether consider their filter advice bad. I personally change mine every time, but the fact is that a good quality filter can capture and hold much more than my oil puts into it, especially if I'm changing my oil several times a season.

You made the argument earlier that we need to consider the source of our information and any bias it may hold. I agree, which is why I'm scratching my head on this one. What would possess a manufacturer to make that schedule if it really allowed more engine wear? That would be idiotic. They, if anyone, have the longevity of their product in mind, and it's certainly no selling point to make the claim that they have less maintenance costs because of it. Why, then?
 

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I have no idea on this one. I too change the filter with each oil change. And I agree that a filter probably has the capacity to stick around for several oil changes and still do its job. But my mechanic days years ago tells me that it is cheap insurance to just change the thing and not wonder. Personally I think that it is just sound reasoning, so Suzuki must have their reasons, but my gut tells me an, "ounce of prevention......is......." Just my old school common sense mentality. I would also bet that there isn't a "Stealer" around that will change the oil without at least strongly suggesting the filter change as well. I was trained by an old school master mechanic that had the skills, experience, and yes at times, good ole common sense that made him the tops in his field. So you and Suzuki are probably technically correct on the intervals for the oil filter, but when I'm 2,000 miles from home, thats cheap insurance I just don't need to think about.

Regards
 

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Agreed. In fact, I've owned several cars that say the same. I always change it.
 
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