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Discussion Starter #1
The title says it all. What were the qualities that made your bosses good or great! I'm mostly interested because I've got a major promotion coming up and will be a memeber of management myself in the next few weeks.

The managers and bosses that I've had that were great were very hard working and would lead by example. They would also be great people in general. They would help you with your personal life and make you a better person in general.

I would love to hear any input that you all have.
 

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Show genuine concern for your staff members. Be a "people builder". You can't motivate people, but you can give them reasons to motivate themselves.
 

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Firstly, congrats on your upcoming promotion. Along with personal satisfaction comes a new set of challenges. Here's my take:

1. Ensure your employees know both your and their roles in the organization. They need to know that you are no longer 'one of the boys,' and that your authority must be respected. After all, you've worked hard to earn that promotion.

2. Establish expectations. Your employees need to know what your standards are in respect to work ethic, quality of work, conduct, attitude, etc. Do not expect your employees to do things you wouldn't do yourself.

3. Lead by example. Your work ethics, quality of work, conduct, attitude, etc. must be beyond all reproach. This can do wonders in motivating your employees.

4. Observe employee work performance and provide consistent and accurate feedback. This can't be done without your active involvement. Provide both positive and negative feedback. Your employees need to know where they stand and what they can do to improve themselves. As far as positive feedback goes, a simple "Thanks for a job well done" can do wonders for employee morale. Also recognize your best employees in the various employee of the month/quarter/year programs.

5. Get to know your employees. As was stated previously, you can start off with small talk. Ask how they and their families are doing. If they respect you in a personal level, they may seek your advice on personal issues as well. Also know their strengths and weaknesses. This helps when assigning tasks and projects.

6. Motivate employees and seek their involvement in major projects. Give them the opportunity to excel. If applicable, make sure they are involved in the decision processes. Giving employees a larger stake in the success of a project may give them the satisfaction they need to further their careers.

7. Mentor your employees. Someday, they will replace you. It is up to you to give them the foundation they need in order to replace you and to be successful in their careers. You've been around for a while. Pass along your experiences.

8. Respect your employees. They are people too. They have certain talents, qualifications, experiences, and accomplishments and you can learn from them as well. Respect is a two way street and is most satisfying when earned. Apply the 'Golden Rule' here.

9. Reward and if necessary, discipline your employees. See #3 above for rewards. Recognize that you will have to make some really tough decisions and fire a certain employee for substandard performance, even though you may think he is a swell guy.

10. Solicit advice from your fellow supervisors/managers. They've been around the organization for quite some time and know the ins and outs. Pick their minds and learn a lot from their experiences.

11. Most importantly, COMMUNICATE!!! All the above cannot take place without effective communication between you and your employees. Remember, communication is a two way street. In addition to being a good speaker, you need to be a good listener as well.

Well, that's all I can think of in a 5-minute time span. Remember, it's up to you to maintain harmony between your employees and your organization. Again, congrats and best of luck to you.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Some good post so far. Thanks!
 

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Phew, I think EZ hit almost all of the points ...

Be available (open door policy) ... let your people know if your door is open, they can come in without an appointment. If your door is closed, you don't want to be interrupted unless the building is on fire. Make sure to have your door open several hours per day.

Management = Meetings. Your team won't always know where you are, since you also work for someone and have to attend "their" meetings. Make sure that your calendar is open for everyone to read, so they know when you'll be back.

Informal communication is key. You will learn more about what is happening (and how projects are REALLY running) during a coffee break than you ever will in a "formal" project meeting.

Positive feedback is important. There is an old saying ... "you will attract more flies with honey than you will with poop*" (*wink* to trappercase). Telling someone honestly that they have done a good job will make them feel great. Sadly, this happens far too little, so when you do it (and it is honest), your team will see you as a great leader and will strive for more. Don't overdue it ... this is something that must be done in moderation, so that when you do it, it has a special meaning to the recipient.

If I didn't stress it enough, be honest. If someone screws up, let them know that you expect them to be honest to you, and tell you that they screwed up. You should then sit down with them and work out a plan how to turn things around. If someone makes a mistake, admits the error, then takes action to correct it, they are learning and growing. If someone makes a mistake and tries to cover it up or shift the blame to someone else, let this person know, in no uncertain terms, that this behavior will not be tolerated.

Once word gets around that you expect your team to be open and honest, and you are tolerant of mistakes (but not finger pointers), you'll have people knocking on your door wanting to work for you.

How NOT to be remembered as a boss

I once had a boss who we (most everyone in the team) called "the cocaine leader". We were doing a large-scale, international project, with software and infrastructure components being rolled out throughout Europe. The project leader was a pharmacist - he had no clue about information techologies. He was a great motivator ... you would go into his office, and he would motivate you (like you had just snorted a couple lines of coke). You came out feeling like "Yea ... I can move mountains". Sadly, the problem that you had was still there waiting for you, and after a while, you were even worse off than before. The "high" was gone, and the problem was still there, along with the knowledge that you had to solve it on your own (because the boss had no clue).

This boss was later launched into a higher position. As the project hit a peak, he jumped off, and was replaced by an even less skilled manager, who then watched this multi-million dollar project come crashing down around him, ending his career within a year.

Rumor has it that the "cocaine" boss was getting kick-backs from one or more of the development companines. In one case, we were billed more than 5 million for development of an application (which never went into production), and supposedly more than half flowed back into bank accounts of our "leader." We'll never know, becase within days after he was promoted, his successor cancelled the contract with the development company, which immediatly closed it's doors and shredded it's books. The owner of the company disappeared without leaving a forwarding address. :roll:
 

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Nice piggyback, inspiron! Your post meshed really well with mine. Man, I can't believe I forgot the open door policy. :banghead:
 

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All I can say is don't be like my boss. He has some underlings that are priorities for him, but not me and my coworkers. He is constantly not showing up to our meetings and doesn't really listen to our concerns when he does show up. Make us feel like we don't even matter.

Some mornings, it just doesn't pay to crawl out of the hole... :mad:
 

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Louis said:
A good boss will work for you. Yes, his job is to give you the means to do your job properly.
Ooh. I like the way you put that. Will you be my new boss? Of course, that would mean moving to the states and to Iowa, I'm not sure which would be worse... ;)
 

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Louis said:
Sure thing Firedog. Let me send you my expected salary first ;-)
Hey, it's not out of my pocket... I don't care what you make as long as you don't lower my salary... ;)
 

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"Poof" problems go away.

I'm a low-level supervisor at my work. I keep in mind that I might just learn something from the people I supervise, and I often do. As a low-level type supervisor I must admit that I feel as though I am their assistant sometimes, because really my folks are on top of the workload, and organzie their time pretty wisely. So I am needed to proofread reports, give advice based on my experience. One of my folks says that she likes bring problems to me, because I "sprinkle magic dust" on the problem and "poof" it goes away. I laugh and say that there is not a problem or error that they can make, that I haven't already made.... and its true. I feel good that my folks feel like they can bring me a problem without guilt or regret. That stuff just gets in the way and is a hindrance in problem solving.
 

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Always let them know your objectives, as a leader you must have foresight and do all in your power to acheve your goals.
When the people under your supervision see that you are goal oriented they should be made to share your objectives.
You can be tough but be fair, always be honest (even brutally so) and do your best to earn the respect and trust of your peers.
If someone lets you down more than once, usually means they are a weak link in your team, let them go or make them less meaningful.
Good luck and I hope you meet your goals and aspirations.
 

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EZridr1 said:
Firstly, congrats on your upcoming promotion. Along with personal satisfaction comes a new set of challenges. Here's my take:

1. Ensure your employees know both your and their roles in the organization. They need to know that you are no longer 'one of the boys,' and that your authority must be respected. After all, you've worked hard to earn that promotion.

2. Establish expectations. Your employees need to know what your standards are in respect to work ethic, quality of work, conduct, attitude, etc. Do not expect your employees to do things you wouldn't do yourself.

3. Lead by example. Your work ethics, quality of work, conduct, attitude, etc. must be beyond all reproach. This can do wonders in motivating your employees.

4. Observe employee work performance and provide consistent and accurate feedback. This can't be done without your active involvement. Provide both positive and negative feedback. Your employees need to know where they stand and what they can do to improve themselves. As far as positive feedback goes, a simple "Thanks for a job well done" can do wonders for employee morale. Also recognize your best employees in the various employee of the month/quarter/year programs.

5. Get to know your employees. As was stated previously, you can start off with small talk. Ask how they and their families are doing. If they respect you in a personal level, they may seek your advice on personal issues as well. Also know their strengths and weaknesses. This helps when assigning tasks and projects.

6. Motivate employees and seek their involvement in major projects. Give them the opportunity to excel. If applicable, make sure they are involved in the decision processes. Giving employees a larger stake in the success of a project may give them the satisfaction they need to further their careers.

7. Mentor your employees. Someday, they will replace you. It is up to you to give them the foundation they need in order to replace you and to be successful in their careers. You've been around for a while. Pass along your experiences.

8. Respect your employees. They are people too. They have certain talents, qualifications, experiences, and accomplishments and you can learn from them as well. Respect is a two way street and is most satisfying when earned. Apply the 'Golden Rule' here.

9. Reward and if necessary, discipline your employees. See #3 above for rewards. Recognize that you will have to make some really tough decisions and fire a certain employee for substandard performance, even though you may think he is a swell guy.

10. Solicit advice from your fellow supervisors/managers. They've been around the organization for quite some time and know the ins and outs. Pick their minds and learn a lot from their experiences.

11. Most importantly, COMMUNICATE!!! All the above cannot take place without effective communication between you and your employees. Remember, communication is a two way street. In addition to being a good speaker, you need to be a good listener as well.

Well, that's all I can think of in a 5-minute time span. Remember, it's up to you to maintain harmony between your employees and your organization. Again, congrats and best of luck to you.
+1
 

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Another thing I should mention:

A good leader is always a good follower. Many great leaders had humble beginnings, and many supervisors and managers were once rank-and-file employees. You should have a knack from seeing things from an employee's point of view, through their eyes if you will. Empathy comes to mind. Also keep in mind that there is someone else higher up in the chain which, relatively speaking, still makes you a follower. Regardless of where you fall in the hierarchy, you are always accountable to someone, just as your employees are accountable to you.
 

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Dont find a way to make your people work,
Find a way to make them want to work.

1. Lead by example
2. There is a time to tell someone to do something, and there is a time to ask someone to do something. I find I work harder at making the boss happy when he asked me to complete a task, but like I said,,,there is a time to order.
3. A pat on the back goes a loooooong way in public, and a as* chewing goes a looooooong way in private, never confuse the two.

These are things I admire in a supervisor, these are leader qualities not supervisor qualities.
 
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