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Update to my comments.

After several letters to Suzuki, they have agreed that there was a paint issue. The pipes have now been replaces and the bike looks great.

While there, I added the driving lights and also replaced the rear tire. Bike is now ready for the upcoming 16 riding season.
 

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I too have a C90t boss 2013. Changed the pipes to the Hard Chromes, the intake to Gman's intake and put on the Gman man Bully. Runs great and sounds great! Not cheap, but great mods.
 

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It's interesting to read the different perspectives we all have about motorcycling and bike brands. I started riding back in the 60s on a Honda 305 hawk. A small underpowered bike that was more fun then I deserved. Over the years I've ridden or owned all the Japanese brands a couple of Harleys, a triumph Bonneville a BMW R60 and my favorite a 1971 Norton Commander. My impression of Honda is safe, dependable and boring. Kawasaki is always pushing the envelope with new ideas. My Kawasaki 1500 was fairly dependableand comfortable on long trips with a Mustang seat; a good bike. The XS650 Yamaha I owned was fun but not suited for long trips and the Suzuki was my sons 600 sport bike, never my cup of tea. The BMW was my fathers bike and I couldn't stand it for the irrational reason it was too perfect. Ah but the Norton, now there was a motorcycle. Good handling in its day and a strong motor that sounded so cool. Now I'm on a Harley Dyna and just as happy as can be. This bike fits me better than any bike I've ever owned or ridden. It handles better than expected on the mountain roads where I live. It is comfortable over the long haul and has good range. I am happy and very much looking forward to spring. In this country the cruiser is king because of movies like The Wild One, Easy Rider and others along with the tough guy image.
 

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As a followup to anrfknm's comment, it reminded me of something a dealer said to me a few years ago.

I took my GSX 1400 down to the local Triumph dealer because I wanted to test ride the Triumph Tiger 1050. Going from my 4-cylinder 1400 to the 3-cylinder 1050 was a huge change. The Triumph 1050 motor is tuned very differently - where my 1400 is designed for torque, the 1050 is designed for power. It responds much faster and has a very different dynamic.

The different geometry of the bikes is also very apparent - my 1400 is a naked touring bike, while the Tiger is more of a multi-purpose bike, much like a BMW GS or a Honda Africa Twin.

When I got back from the test ride, the Triumph dealer mentioned to me - 'Your Suzuki there is an excellent piece of engineering - it's smooth, balanced and functional. The Triumph 3-cylinder isn't like that - it has a heart and a soul." In some respects, he was correct. Riding the Tiger was very different than my GSX 1400. But at the end of the day, I kept my 1400. She's an old lady now (13 years old this year), but she's MY old lady.
 

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I have chrome peeling on the backrest supports. I owned a 2006 C50T with that problem...sold it and bought a 2011 C50T .....same problem...only on the backrest supports...anyone else have this problem and has it been corrected?
 

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Suzuki T series vs. M109R

If you like the 90, you'll love the M109R. I've never regretted buying mine and have no intention of ever selling it, especially when I get another bike.
Zeph, I think you may miss the point as to the preference of the "T" (touring) series by riders that like the included windscreen and backrest and saddlebags that are a package with the T models. Of course, the M109R is an awesome machine with afterburner, kick in the butt power, but other considerations fit other rider's needs. I outfitted my brand new 2007 BLVD C-50 ($7K out the door) with bags, all-day-ride passenger seat, Mustang (just LOVE it) comfy back rest, windscreen, etc. My awesome bike has never failed me on my trips out of L.A. to Kansas, Portland, OR., several times to Colorado... recent as last month, twice to AZ, lost count to 'Vegas AND coupla times a week to CostCo (hauling full saddle bags, back rack and soft trunk with goods ranging from paper towels, bath tissue, kitty litter (35lbs.) etc. that would fill the grocery cart AND parking wherever I want. I even haul wifey's case of Trader Joes 2 buck chuck wine once a month (sob! sometimes twice). My point is that for some it's pragmatism, economy, looks (I still get compliments EVERY time (Nice looking "Harley"--groan!).... er, um, every day that I roll my baby (with 50K mi. on speedo) out into shopping parking lots or gas stations. Still looks almost showroom condition, despite my being a slob. No major repairs, thankfully. Of course, being 80 y.o. and on a limited budget.... gas is NEVER a problem (I sometimes forget to check the fuel gauge), even while touring and with L.A.'s highest in the nation's prices. Oh, when traveling, there's no less than at least 150-200 lbs., I'm packing, with power to spare even up and through the Rockies. Have gone flat out @90mph for hours across I-70 with a bit more to spare. I can imagine how nice it'd be packing 1200cc or even 1600 cc, BUT my 805cc C-50 has served me well and shows no sign of slowing down. My first bike @ 13 y.o. was the 125 cc. "baby" Harley. Have ridden the early BSAs, Nortons, Triumphs, Harleys (sidecar, 3-wheeler) sportster, flathead 45s, Ariel 4, Fanny B, Yamahas, etc. Ride on..... ride safe, love what you ride, everyone. It's the adventure and journey, not the trip as in a cage. Regards, suzukid
 

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Zeph, I think you may miss the point as to the preference of the "T" (touring) series by riders that like the included windscreen and backrest and saddlebags that are a package with the T models.
Yep.
And I don't understand why every other rider in the world doesn't love exactly the same bikes that I do. :fight1:

Actually I DO understand that......and I think the absolute perfect bike is: the one that I am riding at the moment. :bluethum:

P.S. Your posts would be a bit easier to read if you would stick a bit of white space in every few lines.
 

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I'm on my second Suzuki M50, a 2010 Candy Orange Max and now a 2012 blue one. New Zealand is a biker's paradise, lots of good riding roads. I find my M50 is great for a cruiser on the twisties, it's not a sports bike, but definitely better riding than many other cruisers. We have a 100 km/hr (60 mph) speed limit here and its quite rigorously enforced. But I have no problem keeping up with HDs when group riding, and get annoyed when they back off to 80 km/hr on corners that I take at 110 km/hr.

I started riding at 60 years old here in New Zealand, did about 25,000 km (15,000 miles) on a learner 250 cc cruiser, then did maybe 15,000 km (9000 miles) on my first M50, and probably 20,000 km (12,000 miles) on a Honda ST1100 in Queensland Australia - lots of straight roads, large radius sweeper corners, few twisties, ideal country for the ST1100, once rode nearly 400 km for a burger, and then 400 km back home (500 mile round trip). Now on my second M50 back in New Zealand, have done about 15,000 km (9000 miles) on her in the last year. I find the M50 much better to ride than the C50, definitely better than the Honda Shadow 750 which I found heavier and lower powered than the M50.

I chose the M50 because its a mid size cruiser (in my late 60s I need a lighter bike that I can pick up in case I lay it down) it is comfortable to ride and comfortable for my wife to pillion around town, the instruments are up on the bar and not down on the tank, shaft drive, mag wheels and foot pegs (not a foot plate or spoke polishing sort of guy). The original owner drilled four holes in each muffler plate so she sounds great, I've fitted saddlebags, a 40 Litre top box, a small GIVI screen and have just fitted hot grips. I've always found the local Suzuki agents are great, once when I dropped my learner cruiser and broke the clutch lever, they took a clutch lever off a second hand bike on their forecourt to see me through the weekend and ordered a new one in for me on the Monday.

This could be my last bike, just done her 35,000 km oil and filter change the other weekend, change oil and filters at 7500 km/just under 5000 miles and use synthetic JASO MA-2 motor oil. I commute about 70 km (40 miles) most days to and from work. I get 320 km plus,over 200 miles, per tank and she runs on regular petrol (91 RON/81 MON, maybe that's 86 octane in the States?).

I'd love a 2013 M50, they were available in red and as everyone knows red bikes are faster!
 

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When I saw this topic, it got me thinking and I just couldn't help but respond. I'm now in my 50's (I'm like a fine wine with age ... lol) and have been riding since 12 and have had all of the Jap bikes at one time or another. Never owned a HD or BMW. etc. No real reason, just never happened.

My first street bike was a 1977 Honda 750 - four K, for you oldies that would remember that model. I have had a number of makes and models over the years, which included sport bikes, dressers and cruisers. In 2003 I bought my first Suzuki Cruiser, which was a VL1500 Intruder and I absolutely loved that bike. I loved it so much I kept it until this season, when I traded for a 2016 C90T Boss.

Why Suzuki over other Jap's, its a feel. They are all good machines with their + and -'s, but there is just something about the Suzuki ride that I personally love. It has the cruiser sitting position, but I stretch out a little more than other models (I'm 6'5", so important) with my Hwy pegs. It has loads of power and has a nice rumble, but not over bearing so I can hear the wind when I ride to help me relax.

I agree, there are no as many Suzuki's on the road here in Canada as well and I credit that to marketing. Suzuki is less aggressive than the other dealers and it shown in their market share in North America. They have an excellent product and I have always gotten excellent service ... so no real explanation as to why.

I have to say, I was looking hard at the M109 as well, given its power and long sitting position. But my wife joins me from time to time and the C90T was a better setup for tandem tour-riding.
 
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