Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Beer. Nature's Unstoppable Force.
Joined
·
13,226 Posts
Louis said:
Saw an on TV yesterday. I guess I have to brush up on the Yamaha offerings.

113 cubic inch (1854cc) just enough to beat Suzuki 109r.

http://www.yamaha-motorcycles.org/2006Roadliner.php
I did a posting somewhere around here with the relative published horsepower figures on the big bikes (Kawasaki 2000, Honda VTX, Roadliner, and M109R). I searched high and low, and where applicable, posted actual numbers gleaned from dyno's, presumably from the rear wheel.

The looks of the Roadliner may not be most folk's cup of tea, however, it is not all about the size with that bike. It's a Wolf in Sheep's clothing. Up close, it has some "aggressive looking" rubber hidden deep in those skirted fenders. A lightweight chassis. More ground clearance and lean angles than most cruisers. Correct me if I'm wrong, but the industry target for seat height is somewhere around 27.6"/27.8" so "everyman" (and woman) can reasonably flat foot a cruiser. The seat height on the Roadliner is about a full inch higher (28.6"/28.9" somewhere in there...don't crucify me....I'm just too lazy to look it up right now). I would presume, and this just MY observation, that the higher seat height was taken in to consideration because a lot of cruiser riders will run right out and get the lowering kit, by giving another inch to futz with, the bike will retain some sane amount of ground clearance while still giving a fender hugging custom appearance. The real hidden detail I like about the bike, and I am anxious to be able to test ride one (Yamaha had anounced they would underwrite the insurance so the dealers could offer demo rides......of course, every dealer denies any existence of this fact.) to verify for myself is the placement of the engine. It is supposedly further forward and lower in the cradle a'la sport-bike to give it a 50-50 weight distribution, and superior handling for a bike of its heft. Those are serious selling points for me. However, sitting on them, as I have pointed out before, I tick off in my mind different parts I would require to make it more agreeable to me. First off would be a nice set of radius'd drag bars instead of those beach bars. I can't turn the bars full lock w'out striking my knees. I start cutting mental lines on the fenders. They're nice, but at some point, vanity does rear it's ugly head. I'm more of a bobbed fender kinda guy. And though, the exhaust is good looking, to me it's vaguely cartoonish so a slip on would be in order. Yamaha is claiming they outfitted the bike with their EXUP valve in the head pipe. So removing the whole system would not benefit you in any way. I think it's a clever way of staying ahead of the aftermarket loud pipe backlash, but I could be wrong. All in all...on paper, and sitting on it. It's a great bike....I just don't think the styling is going to be a hit with everybody though. I could be wrong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,189 Posts
A freind of mine just sold his V-Star and picked up a Roadliner. I didn't think I'd like it, but it's a very sweet ride. Yamaha done good.
 

·
Beer. Nature's Unstoppable Force.
Joined
·
13,226 Posts
Uncle Bob said:
+1 but you might think about the term paragraph.
Sorry! I left my copy of Strunk & White's home yesterday! ;) :D



texrider said:
Does an air-cooled only engine really belong on such an otherwise advanced machine? Them babies really bake down here.....
Excellent question. I couldn't agree more.

I do remember reading somewhere that Yamaha said they "followed" the crowd as far as Cruiser design and function for the Road Star. Now they have built a "family" and core group of users, they feel they can break from "traditional" Cruiser design and re-write the books.

I don't see anything earth shattering on the Roadliner, but as I mentioned before. The devil is in the details. Hidden touches that make (or will make) it a great bike. However, as far as liquid cooling. I would have to just speculate that since the Road Star powerplant is/has become the darling of the aftermarket vendors, racers, and all around customizers some old school roots will have to remain. Such as the American institution of there is no substitute for cubic inches. Meaning, after the usual mods to the jetting, airbox, and exhaust are done, the next thing to be done to the engine (logically), after the owner gets bored with those gains, is to enlarge the bore and stroke, and then get some decent head work done. Just basic American hot-rodding.

Most liquid cooled motorcycle engines cannot benefit from this process because of the close tolerances between the cylinder walls and the water jackets. Bore too much material out, and you have a useless engine block.

So again, I speculate. The engineers had to leave it a certain degree of low-tech so's not to alienate the core user group who is used to doing things X,Y,Z way.

Some complaints I've heard talking to old-timers. Some look at EFI like some mystical force. They'll go out of their way to find a bike with a carb on it. Those that own a Harley with EFI (the Motor Co. has been slowly forcing them to accept it since 2000 or so), eye it with deep suspicion, and have uneasy truce's with it. Yeah, they've gotten used to the easy starts etc., but they can't fix a lean condition with a tacklebox full of Pilot Circuits, Needles, and Jets, they have to take it to the dealer and have it hooked to a computer. I can see their point, but.........It's like holding back the tide with a 2x4.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
I rode a Roadliner S last Saturday (twice). The adrenaline was still pumping that night. The bike is very light for it's size, so amazingly easy to handle. But don't be fooled. This bike is incredibly fast. I was concerned at first because my salesman rides Ducatis and couldn't believe how fast it is. The styling takes a bit of getting used to but the bike is so solid and performs so well that styling is second on this one. I mean it doesn't look bad at all, just a bit different. Great sound too. For the $14-15,000 I could get it for it would be well worth it, even though it's way more bike than I need.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
494 Posts
I've heard some great things about it on a Star site, and the looks do kind of grow on you. For the extra expense, I'm very satisfied with my Road Star, but I would love a chance to ride one! I think it's a good looking bike from the trees back. That headlight and front fender don't work for me.

The theme they have going with the bike, and the very distinctive dash and tank styling would make it harder to make it your own. They did one on V-Twin TV, or whatever that show was called, and diid a nice job, but I bet they spent at least 1012K on it. Most of us aren't gona want to spend that much on a ride.

Aside from the looks, anyone who has ridden on has been blown away with the complete ride package, from speed to handling. Hopefully, this will push they whole Yammy line to better things as they upgrade the models. I think that motor, or at least the injection package, needs to be in the Road Star. Suzuki wasn't afraid to throw the FI on the entire Bolly line, Yammy should take the plunge no later than '08.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Hello everyone. Just surfed in on your forum looking for stuff for my scooter and thought I'd drop in.
I bought my Roadliner in January and have loved every mile. So far the only thing I dont like in the delay in recieving accessories. Seems like every add on is 2 months away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I have the 2006 Roadliner (2,500 miles), and it is everything that it is supposed to be. A big lightweight cruiser with a lot of power. If you read around the forums, alot of the "Harley" guys wish they bought this one and saved big dollars. I would put this up against anything Harley puts out. The Roadliner has alot of style, chrome, power, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
Good points made here, all I can add is this bike is MUCH better to ride than it is on paper, and it's not exactly junk on paper!!! TONS and TONS of POWER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Do I have complaints, yes but they're small. I've ridden alot of bikes, including the entire Harley line (with exception of the skirtster), and NOTHING compares to this cruiser period.

'06 Strat w/
Patrick Racing BAK
Power Commander
Cobra X-tra longs
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Bought my Roadliner S after my VTX 1800 was totaled. I didn't care too much for the styling when they first came out but it grew on me.

The bike feels much lighter at slow speed parking lot manuvers and handles better in the curves too. They have an aluminum frame and a gallon of the tank is under the seat.

What sold me on the liner was the way it handles, smoother that my VTX. The engine is a piece of art in motion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
this bike reminds me of one of my big block camaros, smoke the tire on the hole shot and get second and third rubber,
I bought this liner after my roadie was totaled, and being used to the roadstar, I stalled the liner at a light and when it started I accellerated away like I would have with the roadie and the rear tire broke loose surprising me big time, not ready for that, I have other friends with roadies and we are always fooling around and are reasonably competitive, but that is over now, I was at first not too happy about that, but I am getting used to the extra ponies, and the tire is now broken in and not so ready to break loose unless I purposely do it.
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top