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trappercase said:
Isn't that dismissive? Considering that the Savage IS prone to oil leaks? Just an observation.
Maybe you should have shared that knowledge with the original poster instead of trying to get into some fracas with me over what is considered polite. For the record, I am always polite you poopy-head!

Freakin' crappy weather.....
 

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trappercase said:
Reason I didn't answer was because I figured the guy had gone to the link and found out more than I knew. If the weather's getting you down, here's a pick me up for ya. Scratch and sniff website. http://www.slabearkazad.com/sniff/
Thanks for the laugh. I can't believe I actually tried it and I can't believe I actually laughed at the results!! :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
 

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Just in case anyone was still interested in this problem, it's not really a problem.

The bike is bulletproof, but it does leak a very small amount of oil from the head, right below the exhaust pipe. It's notorious for doing this, and there really isn't anything you can do about it. It only leaks maybe a teaspoon a week, at max, so it really isn't worth worrying about. It just means you have to wash the bike more frequently and I recommend keeping a shop rag handy, particularly if you plan on showing it off.
 

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If you do your own wrenching, the fix is relatively simple, redesigned plug costs $7.50, it requires removing the head cover, removing the existing, installing the new with proper RTV sealant on it and the head cover (I used Permatex gray, think it was Ultra Gray), reinstalling the head cover and adjusting valve rocker clearances. While at it, it wouldn't also hurt to retorque the head studs.

I can't say specifically what a shop would charge, but it probably would be around 2 may be 3 hours labor. If shop rate is $65 per hour, you can figure the costs.

My wife had a '99 Savage that was seeping oil as described. We had the local dealer do all the above, as well as replace the rings (it had 15k+ miles on it, and he had it apart anyway, so...). Total bill was $150 or so.
 

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Just in case anyone was still interested in this problem, it's not really a problem.

The bike is bulletproof, but it does leak a very small amount of oil from the head, right below the exhaust pipe. It's notorious for doing this, and there really isn't anything you can do about it. It only leaks maybe a teaspoon a week, at max, so it really isn't worth worrying about. It just means you have to wash the bike more frequently and I recommend keeping a shop rag handy, particularly if you plan on showing it off.
This post was made 10 years ago, but I do not concur. That leak in the head can be cured. I did it with my 1987 Suzuki Savage by replacing a defective plug. After that, it stopped leaking, totally. If one is experiencing drips reminiscent of motorcycles 50 years ago, then it needs to be looked into, not natural.

Also, because the bike is totally air cooled, it runs hotter than a water cooled, it will use a little oil during hot weather. i had to add about a quarter quart every couple hundred miles of riding. Those who fail to top off run the risk of ruining their valve train (overhead cam bearings and lobes. Engine doesn't have camshaft bearing inserts, rides directly in machined head aluminum journals). During cooler weather, it used hardly any.
 

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Savage love.

I just got a 2002 Savage 650; mint. The bike fits me physically (5'7'', 150)better than any I've owned, including my old Honda CB350. I've heard that the Savage is one of the most maintenance-free bikes on the road today, but I've also heard rumblings about an oil leak problem. Anyone have any particulars on problems associated with this bike?
I have a 2002 650 Savage and it's a interesting bike. I had to put a clutch in it shortly after buying it, two years ago. The bike has 28,000 miles on it. The only real problem I found is you can't shut off the fuel to the carb. I had the float stick and fuel came out the over flow tub onto the exhaust and catch fire. It melted the brake light switch and the wires to the natural safety switch. I was lucky I had a water bottle handy. From reading I found that sticking float isn't uncommon and I read a bunch of horror stories about rebuilding the carb. I use a super carb cleaner and then tapped the carb with a hammer and freed the float. It hasn't given me a problem since. I have since installed a real fuel shutoff valve inline. My only other complain is the seat is not good for long distances, I can only take it for about two hours. There are after market seats out there that are said to be better but instead of spending the money I just bought a 1986 Goldwing as a touring bike. My advice is run carb cleaner though it from time to time and install a shutoff valve in the fuel line. Have fun.
 

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I have a 2002 650 Savage and it's a interesting bike. I had to put a clutch in it shortly after buying it, two years ago. The bike has 28,000 miles on it. The only real problem I found is you can't shut off the fuel to the carb. I had the float stick and fuel came out the over flow tub onto the exhaust and catch fire. It melted the brake light switch and the wires to the natural safety switch. I was lucky I had a water bottle handy. From reading I found that sticking float isn't uncommon and I read a bunch of horror stories about rebuilding the carb. I use a super carb cleaner and then tapped the carb with a hammer and freed the float. It hasn't given me a problem since. I have since installed a real fuel shutoff valve inline. My only other complain is the seat is not good for long distances, I can only take it for about two hours. There are after market seats out there that are said to be better but instead of spending the money I just bought a 1986 Goldwing as a touring bike. My advice is run carb cleaner though it from time to time and install a shutoff valve in the fuel line. Have fun.
Sounds like your carb bowl drain line is too short and mis-routed. It should not be dripping onto the pipes, is routed down and stubs beyond the frame by the fender.

Also, did you have the petcock in the "PRI" (Prime) position? That bypasses the vacuum pull off valve opening mechanism, helps to fill carb bowl when not run in a while and all the fuel evaporated from the carb.

The bike has a vacuum line to the tank stopcock. When engine is running, a vacuum pulls an internal diaphragm in the petcock and opens the valve. Inasmuch as I don't like this set up, prefer the old mechanical Main-Reserve-Off type petcock. While I owned the bike, I installed 2 new factory petcocks. Seems they'd only last a couple years, then the diaphragm would fail and I'd have to run the bike on "Prime" until replaced.

Before I passed on the bike to a friend, I bought a non-vacuum operated manual replacement for an older Suzuki or Yamaha, can't remember which model. Gave it to the new owner. Only thing is the Reserve pick up tube is slightly shorter than the LS650's, so you had like a half gallon instead of 0.8 gallon as reserve. Helps to carry one of those gallon saddle bag fuel jugs, so you're never short. Out here in rural NM and Panhandle TX, the village you're passing through may have only 1 gas stop and it may have limited hours. Also, I've seen where the fuel truck delivery was not timely so they were out of fuel. Another, I've seen where they had a pump motor failure or power outage. Gas sales were closed.

Wouldn't hurt to add a little Seafoam carb cleaner to the tank every couple months. I learned this with my 4 carb 2001 Kawasaki ZG1200 Voyager XII tourer several years ago. Fuel these days has Ethanol, tends to gum up carbs. Bike was idling a little rough in Oklahoma City. I put the recommended shot of Seafoam in the tank at next gas up. 200 miles later by the time I hit Oklahoma's southern boarder, the engine was running smoothly.

Regarding float problems, I replaced the float valve on the Savage, which cured the problem. Wouldn't hurt to add an in-line fuel filter too. Also check the factory fuel screen in the petcock. If tank is a little rusty, it may have some crud restricting fuel flow or a small piece passed through screen and lodged in the bowl needle valve area allowing fuel to continue to flow when it should have not.

Anyway, my 2 cents on what I've learned.
 

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I tried everything my life I got a 94 Suzuki Savage and the damn thing won't turn all the way over I tried everything again anyone and everyone help is appreciated
 

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Some clarification is needed.......like what is your definition of "everything" ?

Have you tried turning it over with the spark plug OUT ?
Have you checked the battery ??

P.S. It is usually better to start a new thread......instead of tacking your question on to the end of one that is already a year old.
 
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